Marine Vet Acts as Crossing Guard for Elementary Students

Cpl. Lewis Alston explains how he first began helping the children get to school.
3:22 | 09/03/14

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Transcript for Marine Vet Acts as Crossing Guard for Elementary Students
Yes, get excited, people. Open Mike time. In this morning, the retired marine who stepped in when he saw kids putting themselves in danger just trying to get to school. Now he's serving his community just as he served his country. Ah. Reporter: Call him the crossing guardian angel. He protects us and he keeps us safe. Reporter: With hundreds of unmanned streets in the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, the students of martin Luther king elementary school dodge traffic every day but when lewis Alston watched the child run between moving cars, he decided to step in. Before lewis Alston came to help the children cross the street it was really hectic. Even as parents it was difficult to get them to cross the street. Reporter: A wave here, a salute here, the decorated Vietnam vet proudly protects the kids every day as an unofficial crossing guard. Always sporting his signature dress blues. This is a tight community so people that know him and just see the uniform, they respect him. He is inspired me to be in the military because how hardest's been fighting for our country and our state. Reporter: I say good morning and he says good morning right back. And I thank him for making me feel safe and making me safe crossing the street. Ah. And corporal lewis Alston, he joins us live from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Good morning, corporal. How are you? Good morning. How are you? We are great. You know, take us back to the moment when you saw the kids crossing the street, what made you want to jump in. Take us back to that moment. Well, I seen it last year towards the end of the season. School was coming out and I seen a student cross in between the cars there and I said, where is the crossing guard? I said, oh, my god, we need one so I looked and we didn't have one so this past Monday was first day for school and it came heavy on my heart that I need to go down there to see if there is a crossing guard and if there's not a crossing guard then I need to stand in and do it myself until we work this out. What do the kids say when they see you in the morning? Do they check out -- speaking of heart, you have a big heart, also you have a purple heart. Do they check out your purple heart and ask you a lot of questions? Oh, yes, sir, they do. Usually I help them across and they step lively, though, but they'll say good morning to me. They'll say thank you for serving. And they'll ask me a little about my medals but got a lot of fingerprints on now because they like to touch it but that's okay. I can work that out. Get your Polish out. Keep it polished up for the kids. Yes. And, you know, when you first came back from Vietnam there were a lot of people didn't take too kindly to soldiers in uniform. How is the response now? S It's remarkable now. Like when we first came home it was really, you know, hard to put on a uniform because of what was going on. But today always have something veteran on like a vest which says Marine Corps on it, Vietnam, and a lot of ones will come up and say, thank you, sir, for serving and if it's a marine they will say semper fi and it's not bad to put on anything military now. We want to thank you for your service then and thank you for

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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