Nancy Grace: Pistorius 'Believable When Telling His Story'

Grace and Dan Abrams discuss the Olympian's testimony in the South African trial.
3:00 | 04/08/14

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Transcript for Nancy Grace: Pistorius 'Believable When Telling His Story'
Let's bring in our legal team. Dan Abrams. And Nancy grace. Nancy, let me begin with you. What do you make of the demonstration in the courtroom this morning? Well, I think the demonstration was two-fold purpose. At one is to make the court feel sorry for him, in that vulnerable position. And the other is more pragmatic. In showing the judge -- I don't think there's any doubt about this. He was on his stumps at the time he heard -- says he heard the sound in the bathroom. Now, one thing I'll give Pistorius. I found him to be very, very believable when he was tel his story. However, his story was, he heard something when he was adjusting the fan in the bathroom. He thought he heard a window open. He thought he had to get his gun. He went and got his gun. That's where it's going to all go sideways because from this point on, his story does not jive with the neighbors', who claim they heard arguing between a man and a woman. A gunshot, a woman screaming. And then, more gunshots. Let me bring that to Dan. Nancy identified the key moment, hearing the sound, going for the gun. And going for the gun is crucial. This is what he sort of glossed over in his direct examination. He is saying that the gun is under the bed. He's claiming that reeva -- he thinks reeva is in the bed. And he's going under the bed to get the gun out. Now, he described it sort of feeling the side of the bed in what he says is a dark room that he feels under the bed. And then, goes under and grabs his gun. That's, I think, the most difficult for him to explain, which is how could you not have known that she wasn't in the bed? If you're going underneath that bed -- It was on her side, Dan. He's now saying -- he's now claiming he was sleeping on the other side. As he said he did sometimes. He was. But he kept his holster -- the holster with the gun on it was on her side. And right before all this happened, she said, what's wrong? You can't sleep? So, he knew that she was there. And if he got the holster, like you're describing and he did gloss over it, it was on her side. At her level. The mattress. He had to see. You also have a timing problem, right? Which is this happens just shortly after 3:00 A.M. And the experts have come in and testified that he was on his iPad around 1:48 in the morning. He says that they were asleep. The prosecution is suggesting, no. They didn't go to sleep at 10:00 and he didn't wake up suddenly at 3:00 in the morning. They were up fighting. And that's one of the crucial things he'll have to explain, the timing. One of the things we see happening here. His testimony began with the difficulties growing up with the disability. The love he felt for reeva steenka steenkamp. Is this playing on the sympathies of the judge? Can it be effective? It got deeper than that. He went back to his childhood when he had to get his legs amputated at like 11 months old. His mother suddenly died surprisingly. And when he was 15, away at boarding school. Come see your mom. She died ten minutes after he got there. They started at the beginning through all of the bad things that happened in his life. And, yes, it's engendering sympathy. And I told you, Dan, the tears and the vomit have continued all the way up to his testimony. I'm shocked. It's making people feel sorry for him. I am shocked to hear Nancy say he's been very credible. That's a big statement for Nancy to say a defendant is creditable. I'm a trial lawyer. I look at it practically speaking. He's charming. He's very engaging. And his story, so far, because he's not being interrupted or questioned, this is on direct. It's going very smoothly. He gets on cross, he's toast. Well, we'll find out. Nancy and Dan, thank you very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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