New Safety Watch List Raises Ford Focus Concerns

Advocates' list attempts to find potentially dangerous trends earlier than government does.
3:00 | 06/24/14

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Transcript for New Safety Watch List Raises Ford Focus Concerns
We're back, now, with the millions of gm cars recalled due to ignition switch deflects. The lawyer of one family says he's taking safety into his own hands. Reporter: This morning, the parents of a young Georgia woman killed in an accident involving one of those defected gm ignition switches are asking why federal safety officials were so slow in recognizing the problem. And today, they and their lawyers will go public with a top-15 early warning safety watch list, based on auto accident reports. Something they say the government should be doing itself, but is not. It was only after a fatal accident involving this chevy cobalt that it became known that this car and millions of other gm vehicles had a deflective ignition switch that would cut off the power steering. To the outrage of the parents of Brooke Nelson. It makes me livid. Reporter: Gm and the national traffic highway safety administration, had received dozens of problems with the cobalt. Power steering failures. But never put it together until after a dozen deaths, Ip colluding Brooke's. Nhtsa knew that there was a car stall. They didn't make it right. There's all these opportunities that came up. And she died. And she didn't need to die. Reporter: The lawyer for Brooke Melton's parents, lance cooper, who was credited with first spotting the defect, has had safety experts to pore through reports in the government's database, looking for trends that may or may not be defects, that he says the government is failing to recognize. It's in the databases. For whatever reason, they're not acquiring it in a way that allows them to determine that there are deflect trends they need to investigate and make others aware of. Reporter: Number one on the top 15 safety watch list is reported steering problems, of the 2012 Ford focus. The country's best-selling car. They found some 45 reports in the database of injury accidents which drivers said involved steering issues. I lost complete control of the vehicle, wrote one owner to nhtsa. I almost side-swiped cars in other lanes trying to maintain control, wrote soot owner in Florida. I held on for dear life, trying to keep it in the lane, wrote an owner in Oregon. There is no current government investigation on the 2012 Ford focus issues. But the safety experts who created the list say the number of complaints on steering issues involving the focus are far greater than would be expected, even for a best-selling vehicle. We're not saying there is a defect with the Ford focus. We're saying, this is a top trending problem. Someone needs to investigate this and see why. Reporter: The parents of Brooke Melton say they hope this list will mean their daughter's death can help prevent others. The only way I know to overcome the pain and make the pain less is to do something positive like this. And try to strive for doing something positive for someone else. Reporter: Ford says it would move quickly if it thought the data indicated the safety recall was needed. But it does not recognize the methodology used for the top 15 list. As for the government, nhtsa continues to claim it has a good track record for spotting deflects. Despite the criticism, it's failed to do so again and again. Brian, thank you so much. If you want to go to goodmorningamerica.com, and we'll tell you where to find the 15 warning watch list.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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