Secrets of the Sky: What to Know Before Your Next Flight

Pilots across the country reveal everything from safest seats to dirtiest areas on planes.
2:12 | 08/28/13

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Transcript for Secrets of the Sky: What to Know Before Your Next Flight
Now, we get to the sky secrets from our friends at "reader's digest." They have talked to pilots all across the country, to find out the safest seat to the dirtiest spot on the airline. Linzie janis has that report on what the airlines are not telling you. Reporter: Even the most frequent of flyers get freaked out every once in a while. Now, pilots are revealing secrets that will make your next flight better. First off, turbulence is harmless. A lot of people think that could mean a crash. Pilots are perplexed that people get wound up about turbulence. It's virtually impossible for that movement to cause any sort of crash. Reporter: And if you're flying near storms, don't fret over an occasional jolt of lightning. Most pilots have been struck but lightning in an aircraft several times over their career. All airplanes are equipped to withstand it. Reporter: Another secret, you have a baby onboard, it's safer to shell out extra money for their own seats. If you knew that, you probably would just drive. Even though you're allowed to carry your baby on your lap, if there's turbulence or a crash, you're going to lose hold of your child. Reporter: And what about the dreaded airborne germs? People get sick on airplanes because of what they touch. Not because of the air they breathe. The dirtiest places in the airplane, it's the tray table and the little button that makes your seat recline. Reporter: And pilots say fly early and choose your seat carefully. Book your flight as early in the morning as possible. As the day goes on, the air around the ground gets warmer, which causes more turbulence. Reporter: Is there a safest place? The smoothest place? The best place if you want to be safe and comfortable, is right over the wing or as close to the wing as possible. Think of an aircraft as a seesaw. And the middle has the least movement. Reporter: For "good morning america," linzie janis, abc news, new york. A lot of good ideas there. The rest of the tips on "reader's digest," go to goodmorningamerica.Com on yahoo! The latest issue on print and visual newsstands right here.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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