Budget Stalemate: Dems, GOP Argue Over Spending Cuts

With no talks about a solution, both parties argue over who's to blame for across the board cuts.
2:06 | 02/26/13

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Transcript for Budget Stalemate: Dems, GOP Argue Over Spending Cuts
washington and the budget stalemate that means across-the-board spending cuts to kick in on friday. No talks about solving the problem. Instead, the two parties are fighting about what the cuts will mean and who's to blame. Jon karl has more from the white house. Reporter: Good mornin george. The white house is loudly sounding the alarms about what these cuts will mean. But republicans are accusing the president of trying to scare the american people. The white house has already warned of airport delays and meat shortages and lost jobs. Now, greater risk of terrorist attack. I don't think we can maintain the same level of security at all places around the country. Reporter: The president invited the nation's governors to lunch at the white house monday, warning of cuts that will hurt their states. The longer these cuts are in place, the bigger the impact will become. Reporter: The white house has put together a state-by-state report on how the cuts will hurt the disadvantaged. In louisiana, for example, more than 1,700 children will not receive vaccinations. 600 will lose access to child care. But just minutes after lunch with the president, louisiana's republican governor accused him of fear-mongering. He's trying to scare the american people. He's trying to distort the impacts. Reporter: Are you saying they won't happen if the cuts happen? I'm saying the president needs to show leadership and tell congress how he can cut $85 billion without cutting these services. Reporter: We put that directly to the secretary of homeland security. Governor jindal says the president is scaring people. He says the president is scaring people. Is that just wrong? If people are scared it's because the full impact of this is finally being made evident. Reporter: Later this morning, the president travels to newport news, virginia, to highlight how the uncertainty of the defense cuts has put 5,000 shipbuilding jobs on the line. The idea is to put pressure on the republicans. One leader in congress said, mr. President, this is no time for a road show. So, the finger-pointing continues. And it will for some time. Jon karl, thanks very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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