Can This Startup Stop the Biological Clock?

Prelude Fertility's ambitious plan aims to change how women approach having a family and career. Dr. Jennifer Ashton weighs in live in Times Square.
3:29 | 10/19/16

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Transcript for Can This Startup Stop the Biological Clock?
And we are now asking that question, can you stop your biological clock? A new company is taking it on. It's all part of an exclusive "Forbes" story and ABC's Mara schiavocampo has our details. I want to be in a place where I can be the best mother that I can be. Reporter: 28-year-old Katie Cudworth, a successful freelance writer in a committed relationship would love to have kids, just not yet. There's still so much I want to do with my terms of career and traveling. Reporter: Enter prelude fertility which is stopping the biological clock by offering one-stop shopping for fertility treatments did we're all about empowering women to make choices and take control of their fertility when they are most fertile. Reporter: The company offers a four-step process all in one place. Egg and sperm freezing, genetic testing, embryo creation and single embryo transfer to prevent unintentional twins and triplets and trying to make it more affordable. With the egg price $10,000, a pricing plan of $199 a month. So what we're trying to do is bring the costs down so that it's less than a car payment per month. Reporter: An estimated 12% of women have trouble conceiving and now big companies like apple and Facebook cover egg freezing as part of employment benefits. But critics say what prelude is offering is nothing more than a marketing gimmick. Their focus is on women who are delaying childbearing for professional reasons. We have to realize that a lot of these women may get pregnant on their own. Reporter: There are also risks with the procedures like overstimulating the ovaries and pregnantnys in older women can be dangerous. Still, the risks won't stop Katie. There are rifgs when you wake up in the morning and cross the street. To get to the train. I see it as minimizing the risk. Reporter: For "Good morning America," Mara schiavocampo, ABC news, New York. All right, so now our chief women's health correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton is here. What is your take on this. I literally think this is as groundbreaking for economy Len yell women as the pill was when it came out in 1960. Let me tell you why. It's really about changing the paradigm from treating infertility 20 fertility from treating a disease to wellness and from being reactive to being proactive. Big difference. Okay, great. Good to know. Factor, cost obviously. How does that figure into a woman's decision. Cost affordability access he very important. Let me tell you what kind of numbers we're talking about, for one typical egg-freezing cycle which does not include fertilization you're talking about $10,000. Remember, that's per cycle. A lot of mean. For a typical ivf sieblg you're talking about $12,000 to $17,000 per cycle. Neither is a guarantee of a live birth but we know conclusively a woman's chance for a live birth go up the younger her ovaries are at the time of this so very important. As a mom and ob/gyn, are you going to recommend it? I think this should be part of every well woman visit starting in a woman's 20s and I think the reason for that is you need to talk about risks, benefit, pros, cons, when you talk about the cons medical risks very low. The woman may never need to use these eggs and in terms of benefits they important. I will be rebelling this to my daughter. I'm glad you got the memo on the white. Thank you very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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