Top fire safety tips from the American Red Cross and the New York City Fire Department

Josh Lockwood, the CEO of the American Red Cross, and two members of the FDNY share fire safety tips for your home live on "GMA."
3:51 | 11/10/17

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Transcript for Top fire safety tips from the American Red Cross and the New York City Fire Department
You know it's been an unprecedented three months of disasters and throughout it all our partners at the red cross have mobilized 17,000 disaster workers and opened hundreds of shelters and partnered with them during our day of giving to raise $15 million for victims of hurricane Harvey. Now American red cross's regional CEO Josh Lockwood is here to talk about disaster that is can happen to anyone at any time. This stat terrified me. Home fires claim more lives than all natural disasters combined. Yeah, Lara, thanks, seven Americans die every day in home fires and 36 more are injured. We at the red cross are sounding the alarm about home fires so we can save lives. We're going into local communities with fire departments and local partners and we're installing free smoke alarms and at the same time we sit down with families and we develop fire escape plans. Those two things alone can reduce the risk of death by 50%. That's what we are partnering on right now. Yeah so we've gone into over 400,000 homes and we just hit this incredible milestone. We installed our 1 millionth free smoke alarm at the red cross. That's awesome. Thank you. And I am here with lieutenant Anthony Mancuso, fdny and you have other brave firefighters with you and we'll talk about fire safety things. I think we have smoke detectors here. What do we need to know. The first thing is every family should have a working smoke and carbon Mo Knox identify alarm. This is a battery type. Make sure you change them twice a year when you change the clock. You want to test them once a month. We'll test them right now. This way everybody in the house know what is they sound like. That's what's going to wake you up, get you going before the fire gets bad. You want to change them. New technology, as of 2014, there's a ten-year sealed alarm. You could put this in, no battery to change, ten-year alarm, 65,000 of these were donated by the fdny foundation to the red cross and they had their volunteers put them in. Everyone should have a working plan. Have a meeting place. Know where you're going. Two ways out. No what type of building you live in. With your kids as in this sign and continue to reiterate that. Don't wait until they start beeping and still too lazy to change them. We have space heaters here and you hear about so many fires started from space heaters. What's the safest way to use split when using one, number one you want to keep anything flammable at the very least three feet away from the space heater at all times. You always want to make sure you put the space heater on and warm up the room while still awake. Once you go to sleep you want to turn that off. Shouldn't be running all night while sleeping. When you plug it in make sure you plug it in directly to the wall outlet. Don't use extension cords or power strips. For those cooks out there grease fires as well what is the best way to put out a grease fire. Several ways to deal W keep in mind cooking fires are the number one reason we have fires in our home. To deal with it obviously you want to take the air away from the fire. Fire does need air in order to sustain itself. Baking soda will work well on that grease fire. You'll put it on, with an oven Mitt you will direct that baking soda into that pan, creates a film and the fire is gone. Of course, something as simple as covering it. That will take the air away. Also --S if One thing we should realize, Michael, quickly, one thing we should realize, the one thing you never put on a cook fire is, of course, water. Very good. That will extend it. Make it that much worse. Thank you guys so much. We appreciate all that

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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