Achoo! The Worst Cities for Spring Allergy Sufferers

Augusta adapted the motto "we feel good" and erected a statue downtown in honor of soul singer James Brown who made his home here. However, allergy sufferers in Augusta may identify more with Brown's music than his message.

3. Johnson City, Tenn.

Rank last year: 61

Davy Crockett, a famed American frontiersman, was born in a small house outside Johnson City, Tenn. If he suffered from allergies, he might not have been the great explorer and trapper that he was in the late 1700s.

But perhaps Johnson City was less challenging to live in with allergies than it is today.

According to the AAFA report, Johnson City had a below-average rate of medicine utilization compared to the other cities on the list, although their pollen counts and number of allergists were average.

2. Greensboro, N.C.

Rank last year: 29

Greensboro holds a prominent place in American history as the site of the lunch-counter sit-in strikes during the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s

Though not quite as notoriously, Greensboro also holds a place this year as the second most-challenging place to live with spring allergies.

While there is an average number of allergists in the city, Greensboro had high pollen counts as well as high rates of medication utilization.

1. Lexington, Ky.

Rank last year: 52

Lexington, the Horse Capital of the World, scored worse than average in all three rating categories. It has an abundance of pollen, high incidence of allergy medication usage, both prescription and over-the-counter, and too few allergists in the area to treat those affected.

"We are one of the worst cities for allergy," said Miller. Miller said that the seasons in that part of the country are short, with different types of pollens peaking in cycles, one after the other. As soon as residents acclimate to one type of pollen, they must adjust to another type.

In addition, the weather around Lexington this year -- early warm weather without a frost -- may have also contributed to the high pollen count.

But Miller said Lexington, with its mild winters, is a very good place to live, climatewise. And since the severity in winter can vary from year to year, Miller added that taking an average pollen count over several years might have been more accurate.

"Just because you have allergies doesn't mean you can't live in Lexington," Miller said.

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