Talk Therapy Eases Hot Flashes After Breast Cancer Treatment

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"This study didn't really parse out the effect of sharing with a group of other breast cancer survivors -- how the social support of sisters in suffering might also prove empowering and make women more resilient," Prigerson said.

Learning to counter negative emotions can give women back some of the control they feel they lost during their cancer diagnosis and treatment, Hunter said.

"I think it's very empowering, actually, because they've been going through a process where they feel as if their bodies are being managed by other people," she said. "The cognitive-behavioral therapy approach lets them feel as though they've got some control, and think they can apply that to different areas of their life."

After a double mastectomy and aggressive chemotherapy, Alberico said she likes the sound of cognitive-behavioral therapy.

"I'm just sick of all the pills and needles," she said. "If I can do something more natural, that's better. I'm in my 30s, and this is going to go on for a while, so it can't hurt to try."

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