Is There A Natural Remedy for a Fever?

Question: Is there a natural remedy for a fever?

Answer: A common misperception is that anytime you have a fever you have to reduce that fever. The reason we treat high fevers is because of the pain or the aches or the misery that some people have with some high fevers. But low grade fever and fever in general is part of the body's way of fighting infection, and so if you feel reasonably well with your fever you don't need to treat it.

There are no natural remedies that are effective at reducing the fever in the way that drugs are. But simply using a cool sponge bath or drinking plenty of fluids can help control the fever if you don't want to take medication.

If you're an adult, aspirin, Tylenol or ibuprofen are all good choices but we don't want to use aspirin in children under 17 years of age who have a fever. And you should stick with ibuprofen or Tylenol. But remember, not all fevers are dangerous and you're treating the misery that goes along with it, not the temperature.

Next: Should I Take The Homeopathic Remedy Oscillococcinum (Oscillo) For The Flu?

Andrew Pavia, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine
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