Halloween Candy: It's Not How Much Kids Eat, It's When

  • Be aware that the smaller candy bars usually passed out to trick-or-treaters may have different ingredients than their regular-size counterparts.
  • Teach your child to politely refuse offers of home-baked goodies like cookies or cupcakes.
  • More information

    Get more Halloween safety tips from the American Red Cross.

    Beware of Other Haunted Hazards

    On Halloween, parents worry about the safety of their kids as they walk down the streets of their communities, leaving them vulnerable to accidents or injuries.

    Mary Muscari, associate professor of nursing at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and author of Not My Kid 2: Protecting Your Children from the 21 Threats of the 21st Century, offers these recommendations:

    • Help your kids choose costumes that allow for adequate vision and mobility.
    • Trick or treat during daylight hours, or make sure at least part of your child's costume is reflective so motorists can see them. And be sure to plan the trick-or-treat route. Select homes you know.
    • Your kids should have charged cell phones and flashlights on hand. And if you're with them, you should have a cell phone and flashlight, too.
    • Older children and teens should be cautious about controversial costumes. Dressing like a gang-banger on the wrong turf can have disastrous consequences.
    • Flame-resistant doesn't mean fireproof, so keep trick-or-treaters away from open flames.

    SOURCES: Mark Helpin, DDS, Maurice H. Kornberg School of Dentistry, Temple University, Philadelphia; Mary Muscari, Ph.D., associate professor, nursing, Binghamton University, State University of New York; October 2008, news release, American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

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