Poll Shows Strong Support for Obama Health Care Reforms

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A broad swath of Americans support President Barack Obama's anticipated overhaul of the U.S. health care system, especially such key proposed elements as government negotiation with drug companies to lower drug prices, or some form of a national health insurance exchange, a new Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll finds.

In fact, half of the 2,491 adults surveyed in the nationwide poll said they either "strongly" or "somewhat" supported the president's plan to overhaul health care. Twenty-nine percent said they were still not sure about the plan, while 20 percent expressed opposition to the Obama proposals.

While Obama's exact blueprint has not been laid out, he has indicated, both from the Oval Office and on the campaign trail, that the nation's health care system needs to better serve more people at a lesser cost.

Support for certain reforms appeared especially high in the poll. For example, 78 percent of those polled said that allowing Medicare to directly negotiate drug prices with pharmaceutical companies was a "good idea." And, six out of 10 respondents were also positive about the formation of a "national health insurance exchange" that would allow both employers and individuals to choose from a much wider pool of private plans. Both of these initiatives were key parts of the Obama health care policy platform during the campaign.

Humphrey Taylor, chairman of the Harris Poll, said he was "not surprised" by the results of the poll, which was conducted online from Jan. 27-29.

"There's an overwhelming desire to fundamentally change the system, not only from the public but also from doctors, employers, insurers, everybody," he said. "Of course, different people want to see different things. But very few people think that the system as we have it now is even close to what we ought to have."

The poll shows that as Americans learn more about Obama's anticipated reforms, they seem better able to make up their mind about them -- either pro or con. For example, 62 percent of those surveyed who said they knew "a lot" about the new president's ideas expressed support for the initiatives, with 36 percent opposed and only 2 percent saying they were "not sure." Among those who said they knew nothing about the Obama proposals, 66 percent remained unsure, 23 percent were supportive, and 11 percent opposed.

Some other key findings:

  • A majority of respondents said the reforms, if carried out, would improve the health care system. Sixty-one percent felt reforms would deliver adequate health insurance to more people, and 54 percent thought health care would be made more cost effective. But a fifth of respondents thought the changes would make the quality of medical care worse, not better.
  • Support for the proposals did not vary significantly based on income. Fifty percent of people making between $15,000 and $25,000 annually approved of the Obama plan, compared to 51 percent of those making $50,000 or more. But the gap widened as respondents looked at specific issues, such as the plan's ability to boost the quality of care or strengthen the economy.
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