If I Have No Symptoms, What Kinds Of Screening Tests Should I Have To Determine If I Have Heart Disease?

Question: If I have no symptoms, what kinds of screening tests should I have to determine if I have heart disease?

Answer: Well, there is much evidence that the most, maybe even as much as three-quarters of coronary disease is potentially preventable by changes in lifestyle. You should have a frank conversation with your doctor about potential risk factors.

They might include: one, your blood pressure; two, your family history; three, your weight -- or what doctors may refer to as a "BMI," which is your weight compared to how tall you are; waist circumference is also looked at. Being a man with a 36-inch waist is a good thing, but a 40-inch waist size, we know that's a risk factor for heart disease . Number five, you may want to look at your cholesterol. Six, your blood glucose.

So, screening can include evaluations by your doctor of all these things, to know whether or not you're potentially at risk for developing coronary artery disease.

Next: Should I Get Tested If I Have A Family History Of Heart Attack?

Previous: What Is The Role Of Screening Tests In Detecting Possible Heart Disease?
-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 4222190. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 4222190. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 4222190. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 4222190.
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Chris Soules and Whitney Bischoff are seen at ABC Studios for Good Morning America on March 10, 2015 in New York.
Josiah Kamau/BuzzFoto/Getty Images
PHOTO: Former Olympic athlete Bruce Jenner arrives at the Annual Charity Day hosted by Cantor Fitzgerald and BGC Partners, in New York, Sept. 11, 2013.
Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP Photo
PHOTO: The Lamborghini SpA Urus sport-utility concept vehicle is unveiled during a Volkswagen AG event in Beijing, April 22, 2012.
Nelson Ching/Bloomberg/Getty Images
PHOTO: Researchers say that this skull, which shows two fractures believed to be created by blunt force trauma, is the earliest evidence of murder in human history.
Sala N/Arsuaga JL/Pantoja-Perez A/Pablos A/MartiĀ­nez I/Quam RM