The Face and Life of Marfan Syndrome

He's bedridden for most of the day and can stand up on his own long enough to pivot into his wheelchair. His mother drives him to school and assists him on his way to class. Rudes says he spends the rest of his days at home, "where I man the helm of my hospital bed as I study, read books and play the occasional video game."

"I always felt that if I had no other problems than just being in a wheelchair, I'd have a wonderful life," Rudes said. "It's all the offshoots of pain that contribute to a very complicated web indeed."

For more information on Marfan Syndrome, visit The National Marfan Syndrome Foundation

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