Doctors Reveal Shrapnel Removed From Victims Injured in Brussels Attacks

PHOTO: King Philippe and Queen Mathilde of Belgium look at fragments of iron shrapnel from a nail bomb at the Campus Gasthuisberg UZ hospital in Leuven, outside Brussels, March 24, 2016. PlayLaurie Dieffembacq/AFP/Getty Images
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Two days after the Brussels attacks, doctors at a hospital that treated some of the bombing victims revealed the shrapnel removed from some of the patients.

The shrapnel -- bits of metal, screws and nails -- was shown to the Belgian king and queen when they visited the Campus Gasthuisberg UZ hospital in Leuven, outside Brussels.

King Philippe and Queen Mathilde came to the hospital to visit with victims and the medical staff who worked to save their lives after the attacks.

Some of the shrapnel was reportedly from nail bombs, according to Getty.

PHOTO: A surgeon at the Gasthuisberg hospital in Louvain, Belgium, shows shrapnel removed from victims of the bombing attacks in Brussels, March 24, 2016.Francois Lenoir/Reuters
A surgeon at the Gasthuisberg hospital in Louvain, Belgium, shows shrapnel removed from victims of the bombing attacks in Brussels, March 24, 2016.

PHOTO: A surgeon at the Gasthuisberg hospital in Louvain, Belgium, shows shrapnel removed from victims of the bombing attacks in Brussels, March 24, 2016.Francois Lenoir/Reuters
A surgeon at the Gasthuisberg hospital in Louvain, Belgium, shows shrapnel removed from victims of the bombing attacks in Brussels, March 24, 2016.

PHOTO: A surgeon at the Gasthuisberg hospital in Louvain, Belgium, shows shrapnel removed from victims of the bombing attacks in Brussels, March 24, 2016.Francois Lenoir/Reuters
A surgeon at the Gasthuisberg hospital in Louvain, Belgium, shows shrapnel removed from victims of the bombing attacks in Brussels, March 24, 2016.

Witnesses to the attacks described people with severe injuries from shrapnel. Dr. Laura Billiet, an internal medicine physician from America who was at the Brussels airport at the time of the attack, said she saw many people with shrapnel wounds underneath their clothes.

"The first airport employee I saw -- all her hair had been singed off on one side, she had shrapnel in her face and blood all down her shirt and her pants were soaked in blood," Billiet told ABC News. "I cut the pants off her and she had lots and lots of shrapnel wounds in her leg that were bleeding. A lot of people looked like that, some kids -- that was the hardest thing to see for us."

PHOTO: A nurse of the Campus Gasthuisberg UZ hospital in Leuven, Belgium, shows fragments of iron shrapnel from a nail bomb, March 24, 2016.Laurie Dieffembacq/AFP/Getty Images
A nurse of the 'Campus Gasthuisberg UZ' hospital in Leuven, Belgium, shows fragments of iron shrapnel from a nail bomb, March 24, 2016.