Dying Boy Logan Stevenson Shares in Parents' Wedding Day

VIDEO:Two-year-old Logan Stevenson served as best man at his parents wedding.
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A Pennsylvania couple tied the knot this weekend after having only one week to prepare for their wedding to ensure their 2-year-old son, who is dying from a rare disease, would be present to share in the experience.

Doctors told Christine Swidorsky and Sean Stevenson that Logan, their little boy, only had weeks to live.

The couple had been planning to get married next year, but once they got the dire news from the doctor, they decided to move up the wedding, which took place Saturday in Jeannette, Pa., a suburb of Pittsburgh.

They had the 12-minute ceremony in the backyard of their home.

Logan wore a pin-striped suit as he was carried by Swidorsky.

"This is our dream come true," said Swidorsky, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported Saturday.

Sean Stevenson thanked friends and family who donated food and helped out with wedding arrangements so the family could spend much of the day together.

"It means the world to me. It means the world to me. We're just blessed every day that he's here with us," he said.

Logan was born with a rare blood disorder called Fanconi's anemia, which keeps cells from repairing damaged DNA and can lead to certain cancers.

"We knew about that but always had it in back of our minds that we've just got to get over this next hump no matter what it was," Stevenson said earlier in the week.

Even though Logan was born a month early and had difficulty eating, Stevenson said he was a normal baby for the first year of his life.

A few months after his first birthday, however, Logan was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, which is uncommon in people younger than 45, according to the American Cancer Society.

Logan underwent chemotherapy and a cord blood transplant, and went into remission for nine months.

"As time went by, we started noticing Logan was doing really good." Stevenson said. "It kind of seemed like our family was getting back to some kind of normalcy."

But it didn't last. Swidorsky noticed Logan was acting strange, Stevenson said. He lifted his left arm a lot as if he were stretching, but she sensed there was something wrong with her son. They soon learned he had a tumor the size of an orange on his left kidney.

Doctors removed the tumor and the kidney, leaving Logan with a right kidney that was smaller than normal and didn't function properly, which is common in Fanconi's anemia patients. Further therapy to shrink the tumor wasn't possible, Stevenson said.

That was when doctors advised the family to make memories while they still could. They called the Make-a-Wish Foundation and set up a trip to Disney World (Disney World and ABC News are both owned by the Walt Disney Co.). On the second morning of their trip, Logan's grandmother woke Swidorsky and Stevenson.

"There's something wrong with Logan," she said.

Stevenson saw that Logan was lethargic and his eyes rolled toward the back of his head.

After stays at two hospitals in Florida, where doctors told the family that Logan was dehydrated and in septic shock, Logan was returned to Pittsburgh Children's Hospital on a medical flight. After spending almost three weeks on a ventilator, he woke up.

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