Older Adults May Drink, Smoke More When Financially Stressed

PHOTO: A study of more than 2,300 older Americans found that some were at risk of drinking more if their finances took a hit.
Share
Copy

Stress can lead people to the bottle as a way of self-medicating, and now a new study finds that older adults, especially men and people with less education, are more likely to drink and smoke when experiencing financial woes.

Researchers at the State University of New York at Albany studied more than 2,300 adults over the age of 65. They found that 16 percent of study participants reported increasing financial problems over the 14-year study period, between 1992 and 2006.

Three percent of the study population reported increases in heavy alcohol consumption and one percent said they upped their smoking habits.

But those numbers increased significantly among men who experienced financial difficulties—they were about 30 percent more likely to begin heavily drinking when compared with men who did not have money problems.

Experts speculated that men may drink more during these times because they feel they've failed as the "breadwinner" and may have less social support than women do.

"Many people believe that the health behaviors of older adults are entrenched – that they are set in their ways," said Benjamin Shaw, lead author of the study and associate professor and chair of health policy, management and behavior in the School of Public Health at University at Albany. "If any change does occur, most people would expect to see a slowing down of activity, which with regard to alcohol and smoking would involve reductions in consumption."

Shaw said older adults are particularly vulnerable because they are usually retired, and may feel like they have less control and less time to recover from a financial setback.

Researchers did see a decline in drinking among older women who fell under financial hardship. Older people with higher education levels also seemed to cut back on alcohol if money problems came into play.

"This is a little bit surprising just because, generally speaking, people with more money are the heaviest drinkers," said David Jernigan, associate professor of health, behavior and science at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "White people making $75,000 or more tend to be the most prevalent population of binge drinkers."

"If they're poor and they drink, they're more likely to be a heavy drinker, which goes along with this study's stress hypothesis," he explained.

Shaw said with an increase in the number of adults facing financial difficulties in the wake of the current financial downturn, "we can probably expect to see more and more older adults misusing alcohol and smoking."

Dr. Petros Levounis, director of the Addiction Institute of New York at St.Luke's-Roosevelt in New York, praised the study methodology, but he also noted a key population that is missing from the group—those who have gotten sober, but then turn back to alcohol during stressful periods.

"Stress can affect people in sobriety, meaning people who used to be heavy drinkers, who may have stopped for 20 or 30 years, and then they fall under tough economic times and they relapse," said Levounis. "That's of great concern."

Substance abuse often goes unrecognized among the older population, said Levounis.

"By the time we catch the illness, it has already progressed to its more severe form," said Levounis. "It's important to intervene early so the person can receive a better chance of addressing the problem."

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Ebola patients Nina Pham, left, Dr. Craig Spencer, center, and Amber Vinson are seen in undated file photos.
Courtesy Pham Family | LinkedIn | Obtained by ABC
PHOTO: Television personalities Mama June and Honey Boo Boo are seen in this, June 11, 2014, file photo.
Douglas Gorenstein/NBCU Photo Bank/Getty Images
PHOTO: Overall winner for the Wildlife Photography of the Year 2014, The last great picture by Michael Nick Nichols.
Michael Nick Nichols/Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014
PHOTO: A New York City subway train is pictured in this stock image.
Andrew A. Smith/Getty Images