North Korea Warns of Strikes Against 'All of Mainland USA' Amid Hacking Claims

PHOTO: North Koreas leader Kim Jong Un waves to spectators and participants of a mass military parade celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice in Pyongyang, North Korea in this July 27, 2013 file photo. PlayWong Maye-E, File/AP Photo
WATCH Sony Pictures Vows to Release 'The Interview' in Some Form

North Korea has warned of attacks against the United States, accusing the Obama administration of being behind the making of the movie "The Interview."

After the United States publicly accused the communist country of coordinating the cyberattack against Sony, a North Korean government spokesman, speaking on state-run TV, discussed targeting “the White House, the Pentagon and … all of mainland USA” if the United States does not agree to a joint investigation of the incident with North Korea.

North Korea has long proclaimed innocence in the Sony hacking scandal, which escalated to threats of violence against movie theaters that showed the movie. The film’s plot focuses on the assassination of leader Kim Jong un.

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Obama, who promised to respond “proportionately” to the attack, clarified how he views the incident.

“I don’t think it was an act of war. I think it was an act of cybervandalism that was very costly, very expensive,” Obama said in an interview with CNN’s “State of the Union.”

The Obama administration is reviewing whether to put North Korea on its list of state sponsors of terrorism. North Korea came off the list in 2008 under President George W. Bush.

“The Interview,” starring James Franco and Seth Rogen, was scheduled for theatrical release Dec. 25. Sony says it is exploring ways to distribute the movie, but at this point no distribution plan has been revealed.