Paris Terror Attacks: French Authorities Hunt Hayat Boumeddiene

PHOTO: In this 2010 file photo, Hayat Boumeddiene trains with an arrow gun in the Grenoble area of France, who is wanted in connection with the shooting of a French policewoman and for being involved in the hostage situation.PlayObtained by ABC News
WATCH Search Continues for Female Terror Suspect in France

French law enforcement continued searching for a woman linked to two of the men suspected in terror attacks that killed 17 people over three days.

Hayat Boumeddiene is the girlfriend of Amedy Coulibaly, who killed a police officer in Paris on Thursday, according to French law enforcement. A spokesman for the interior ministry said she wasn't present during the shooting.

Police killed Coulibaly, 32, the next day while raiding a kosher market where they say he had killed four people.

Authorities described Boumeddiene, 26, as armed and dangerous. She married Coulibaly in a religious ceremony in 2009 but their wedding was not legally recognized in France because they did not have civil union.

PHOTO: Hayat Boumeddiene is pictured in this image distributed by Direction centrale de la Police judiciaire. Direction centrale de la Police judiciaire/Getty Images
Hayat Boumeddiene is pictured in this image distributed by Direction centrale de la Police judiciaire.

The couple lived in a Paris suburb and spent the last year in contact with the wife of Cherif Kouachi, one of the men believed to be responsible for the attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo, according to the Paris public prosecutor's office. Boumeddiene and Kouachi's wife reportedly exchanged approximately 500 phone calls.

While Boumeddiene was never convicted of a crime, she had several run-ins with police and was once questioned about her reaction to attacks by al Qaeda, according to judicial records obtained by The Associated Press.

"I don't have any opinion," she said.

With Boumeddiene on the loose today, the French government urged the nation to remain vigilant as security forces try to thwart new attacks.

"Given the context, we are exposed to risks," French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said after an emergency security meeting.

Cazeneuve said the government is deploying hundreds of troops in addition to thousands of police and other security forces and maintaining its terror alert system at the highest level in the Paris region.

He said investigators were focused on determining whether the attackers were part of a larger extremist network. In a statement to the AP, al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula calimed responsibility for the attack at the offices of Charlie Hebdo.

The family of Ahmed Merapet, a Muslim police officer who was killed outside the offices of Charlie Hebdo, asked for an end to violence.

"Do not confuse those extremists and Muslims," Merapet's brother Malek Merabet said, according to news station France24. "Do not confuse the mad men. They have no color and no religion."

Today the names of four people killed in a kosher grocery store were released by the Representative Council for Jewish Institution in France. The names were listed as Yoav Hattab, Philippe Braham, Yohan Cohen and François-Michel Saada.

PHOTO: A security officer directs released hostages after they stormed a kosher market to end a hostage situation, Paris, Jan. 9, 2015. Michel Euler/AP Photo
A security officer directs released hostages after they stormed a kosher market to end a hostage situation, Paris, Jan. 9, 2015.

The three-day wave of violence culminated in concurrent standoffs Friday.

At a printing company in the town of Dammartin-en-Goele, 20 miles northeast of Paris, police killed Said and Cherif Kouachi after authorities say the brothers came out of the building firing at them. At the same time, police killed Coulibaly as he holed up a kosher market in Paris.

PHOTO: Hostage situations were reported Jan. 9, 2015 in Porte de Vincennes in Paris, France, and in Dammartin-en-Goele, located northeast of the city.ABC News
Hostage situations were reported Jan. 9, 2015 in Porte de Vincennes in Paris, France, and in Dammartin-en-Goele, located northeast of the city.

The simultaneous standoffs were linked with suspected gunmen in each situation connected through an earlier attempt to break a convicted terrorist out of jail, Paris' public prosecutor said.

Coulibaly was convicted of involvement in a previous attempt to help a convicted terrorist escape custody, while Cherif Kouachi was released.

The man they were accused of trying to free from prison was Smain Ali Belkacem, who was convicted of being behind the 1995 attack on the Paris transport system that killed eight people and wounded 120.

PHOTO: Police and army forces take positions in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects, Jan. 9, 2015. Michel Spingler/AP Photo
Police and army forces take positions in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects, Jan. 9, 2015.

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The Associated Press contributed to this report.