Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • Michael Christopher Brown's "Libyan Sugar" centers around the 2011 Libyan Revolution, detailed through photographs, journal entries, and written communication with family and colleagues. "Libyan Sugar" is a depiction of a youth uprising that quickly became a bloody civil war, through the eyes of a young photographer looking to make a difference. Pictured, a young child guards the courthouse, April 15, 2011, in Benghazi. Pre-order "Libyan Sugar" from <a href="https://twinpalms.com/books-artists/libyan-sugar"external">Twin Palms</a>, out Nov. 2015.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • When asked by ABC News why Brown choose Libya, he states: "Primarily I was there because of what was happening, a curiosity about what the media called the ‘Arab Spring,’ what that was and what that meant. There was also an attraction to the country itself, a beautiful though largely desolate place mostly closed to the world for decades, and there was this character Gaddafi." Pictured, revolutionaries heading to the front line, March 3, 2011, in Ajdabiya
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • A bus used to transport government troops burns during an assault on Benghazi, March 20, 2011.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • Libyans rally against Gaddafi in Benghazi, April 13, 2011.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • On April 20, 2011, Brown was wounded with shrapnel in an explosion in Misrata. It was the same incident that took the life of photojournalists Chris Hondros and Tim Hetherington, and severely injured Guy Martin. "I had survived a bombing that killed Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros and killed and injured numerous Libyan fighters. ... They [revolutionaries]... provided they could walk, would return to fighting within a few days. After watching fighters do this on several occasions it was difficult to leave Libya." Pictured, Guillermo Cervera and Tim Hetherington, April 18, 2011, in Misrata.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • "What is that spirit of a revolutionary...On a straight road with no end in sight...Of millions with great emotion and love and a cause and courage and fear, and glory...Men went with one gun or no gun, or went with nothing but a knife. Most had little or no military training. They were carpenters, teacher, physicians, mechanics and men of society but not men of war." - an excerpt from "Libyan Sugar" Pictured, Revolutionaries head toward the front line, to the east of Bin Jawad, March 6, 2011.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • Brown visited Libya eight times between February 2011 and May 2012. "Libyan Sugar" covers prominently his trips made in 2011. He tells ABC News, "I spent in total about 7 months in the country, made and lost friends, and as the place changed I changed so there was an attachment to it. I’m not Libyan but the place became a part of me. I wanted to keep going back, until mid-2012, when a writer and I were briefly kidnapped in Benghazi, when I realized Libya had become too unpredictable. Pictured, blood covers the bed of a parked technical truck driven by revolutionaries, April 8, 2011, in Ajdabiy
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • Interrogating a government fighter, at lower left, April 1, 2011, in Benghazi.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • "Disguised government fighters ambushed the checkpoint. Several others and I hid behind vehicles then ran through incoming anti-aircraft artillery fire and jumped, some headfirst, into a slowly escaping old car driven by an old man. The man slowly sped up as I yelled 'GOGOGO!' while a grenade rolled around the floor beneath his feet. I looked up after a minute and saw this. Al-Agayla, March 26, 2011." - an excerpt from "Libyan Sugar"
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • "The book is dedicated to the revolutionaries, which at that time were just ordinary men, just citizens of Libya who helped defeat a dictator." Pictured, celebrating the liberation of Tripoli, Aug. 31, 2011, in Martyr's square, formerly Green Square.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • Today, Libyans are in a time of uncertainty with different governments struggling for power with an elected parliament and government based in the eastern port city of Tobruk and a Islamist militia-backed government in the capital Tripoli with militants from the Islamic State group. NATO is working to unify the Libyan government in fears that terrorist organizations will take control of a fragile country. Pictured, a man celebrates the end of the war, Oct. 29, 2011, in Sirte.
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
  • "Maybe we should always show pictures. Bin Laden. Pictures of the wounded service people. Pictures of maimed innocent civilians. We can only make decisions about war if we see what war actually is. And not as a video game where bodies disappear leaving behind a shiny gold coin." A quote from Jon Stewart sent to Brown from a friend, May 8, 2011. Pictured, Bloody handprints seen on the wall of a former secret police cell inside an elementary school, April 27, 2011, in Tripoli. <a href="https://twinpalms.com/books-artists/libyan-sugar" target="external">Pre-Order "Libyan Sugar"</a>
    Michael Christopher Brown/Magnum
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus