North Korean Test - Was it Nuclear?


U.S. Doubts Korean Test was Nuclear

U.S. intelligence agencies say, based on preliminary indications, that North Korea did not produce its first nuclear blast yesterday. (Washington Times)

Blast May Be Only a Partial Success, Experts Say

The North Korean test appears to have been a nuclear detonation but was fairly small by traditional standards, and possibly a failure or a partial success, federal and private analysts said yesterday. (New York Times)


Videotape Released Showing Taliban Activities

A private television channel in Pakistan on Monday received a video cassette that clearly shows activities of Taliban who are putting up resistance against allied forces in Afghanistan. (Pak Tribune)

Kabul Explosion 'Injures Eleven'

At least 11 people, including a number of police officers, have been injured in an explosion in the Afghan capital, Kabul, say police. (BBC)


Documents: CIA Warned of Plane Bomb Plot

An anti-Castro militant now in a Texas jail warned the CIA months before the 1976 bombing of a Cuban airliner that fellow exiles were planning such an attack, according to a newly released U.S. government document. (AP)


Another 60 Bodies Found in Baghdad

Authorities found the mutilated bodies of 60 men in Baghdad in the 24 hours ending Tuesday morning, likely the latest victims of the sectarian death squads that roam the capital. (Asharq Alawsat)

Brazen Attack Kills Third Sibling of Iraqi Vice President

Gunmen killed the brother of Iraq's Sunni Arab vice president on Monday, drawing swift condemnation from across Iraq's political divide and US officials. (Daily Star)


The Long Arm of China's Secret Police Reaches Into the U.S.

The white van gunned into a busy Fairfax County, Va., intersection last January, turned right and sped at the line of cars across the yellow line, seeming to aim at the Hyundai Elantra waiting for the light to change. (Congressional Quarterly)


Strong Case for U.S. to Question A.Q.

Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf, in his book In The Line of Fire, has provided sufficient evidence to hold Pakistan's nuclear scientist, Dr A.Q. Khan, responsible for the clandestine development of the North Korean nuclear programme. This could lead to a direct interrogation of Dr Khan by the US now that North Korea has clandestinely carried out a nuclear test. (The Asian Age)


Forced to Confess, Say Mumbai Train Blast Accused

Seven men who confessed to being involved in the deadly July 11 Mumbai train bombings have retracted their confessions, saying they were beaten by police and forced to admit to the crime, their lawyer said Tuesday. (Daily Jang)

Kids Work As Ban On Child Labor Starts In India

Ten-year-old Sonu sits forlornly on a plastic chair in a ramshackle street food stall in New Delhi, taking a break after serving customers tea. (Reuters)


Fighting Cuts Off 224,000 In Darfur From WFP Food

Nearly a quarter of a million people in Sudan's Darfur region cannot access U.N. food rations due to fighting, the World Food Programme (WFP) said on Tuesday. (Reuters)


Germans Nab Iraqi in al Qaeda Web Case

An Iraqi man suspected of spreading messages by al Qaeda leaders on the Internet in the past year was arrested Tuesday in Germany, prosecutors said. (AP)


Human Error Blamed for 2005 Greek Crash

Investigators cited human error Tuesday as the main cause of the Helios Airways crash that killed all 121 passengers and crew near Athens on Aug. 14, 2005, the deadliest air disaster in the history of Greece and Cyprus. (AP)


North Korea and the Bomb

Let us all agree: North Korea's government is too erratic, too brutal, and too willing to sell what it has built to have a nuclear bomb. (NY Times)

Nightmare Scenario: A-Bombs For Al Qaeda

By Doug Saunders

The most alarming thing about Kim Jong-il's new weapons, to many knowledgeable observers, is not the nuclear threat itself. It is the way the world's major powers might respond to them. (The Globe & Mail)

The Egyptian Nuclear Bomb

By Abdul Rahman Al-Rashed

This month's big surprise was Cairo's announcement that it intends to resort to nuclear power by way of not one, but three nuclear power plants. (Asharq Alawsat)

TONIGHT: The Enemy Within

Five years after the attacks on 9/11 and the massive, multibillion-dollar reorganization of government agencies which followed, FRONTLINE and New York Times reporter Lowell Bergman investigates the domestic counterterrorism effort and asks whether we are any better prepared to prevent another catastrophic attack. Relying on interviews with high-level sources in the U. S. government, Bergman looks into the major cases brought inside the United States and reveals troubling flaws in what has been the largest reorganization of the government in half a century. The documentary focuses on who is the real enemy within the United States and whether we are prepared to defeat him. (Frontline)

Compensation from the Accused

By May 2009, Japan will introduce a lay-judge system in which randomly chosen citizens will sit with professional judges to decide guilt or innocence in criminal trials involving charges such as murder, rape and arson, and then hand down sentences if the accused are found guilty. (The Japan Times)

The 'Chechnyaization' of Russia?

By Abdullah Iskandar

Russia, and the way power is exercised there, is back in the spotlight after the assassination of journalist Anna Politkovskaya, last Saturday. Many observers believe that the murder was a clear expression of this power, and of the way it has been exercised since the former president, Boris Yeltsin, announced the shift from a communist to a democratic system. (Al Hayat)

The Insider Daily Investigative Report (DIR) is a summary of major news articles and broadcasts relating to investigative news, including international terrorism and developments in Iraq. The DIR is edited daily from foreign and U.S. sources by Chris Isham, Hoda Osman and Elizabeth Sprague of the ABC News Investigative Unit. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of ABCNEWS.