6 Things to Watch for at Prince George's Christening

PHOTO: Royal wellwishers gather and display their home made placards and greetings to the media,  as they wait outside St Jamess Palace, for the christening of Britains Prince George, in London on Oct. 23, 2013.
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With Prince George's godparents already named, here's a look at how the special day will unfold for the third in line to the British throne.

1. Boy George

The little fellow hasn't been seen in public since his first appearance outside the hospital in July, although an official photo was released when he was 4 weeks old, sleeping in Kate's arms. We know from his dad that he's got "a good pair of lungs on him," is "a little bit of a rascal" and is a "fighter." So perhaps the Archbishop of Canterbury, who is performing the christening, should be nervous. Today's baptism should go more smoothly than Queen Victoria's in 1819, when her parents argued during the ceremony over what her name should be. It's already official: He will be christened George Alexander Louis.

Prince William and Kate Middleton Veer From Tradition With Prince George's Godparents

2. It's a Small Family Gathering

Unlike his departure from St. Mary's hospital in front of the world's media, Prince George's christening will be a private affair, with only 22 guests. William and Kate have chosen to hold the service in the Chapel Royal, a relatively small, intimate church. It has special significance for William, because it's where Diana's coffin lay before her funeral. Only immediate family, godparents and their spouses have been invited. The queen, Prince Philip, Prince Charles, Camilla and Prince Harry will be joined by Kate's siblings, Pippa and James, and her parents, Carole and Michael. The Middleton grandparents continue to play an important part in George's life. They were the first to visit after he was born. Baby George spent the first weeks of his life in their home. Michael even took the first official photo of George.

3. But It's Not Exactly a Normal Christening

Prince George is a future king, third in line to the throne, and will one day be the 43rd monarch since William the Conqueror. He will also be the head of the Church of England, so its spiritual leader, the Archbishop of Canterbury, will carry out today's ceremony. As the bishop has said in a YouTube video message, "As a nation we're celebrating the birth of someone who in due course will be the head of state. That's extraordinary. It gives you this sense of forward looking, of the forwardness of history as well as the backwardness of history." Prince George will wear a replica of the christening robe made for Queen Victoria's oldest daughter in 1841. It's a satin and lace number.

Royal Baby Revealed in Family Photos

4. Although There Will Be Some Breaks With Tradition

Kate and Will are still doing some things their own way. Prince George is the first future monarch in modern times not to be baptised at Buckingham Palace. The royal couple have waited for longer than usual to christen their baby. William, Charles and the queen were all baptised at 4 to 6 weeks old. Charles was 4 weeks old, and the queen was five weeks old. And then there are the godparents, seven in all, a mix of old friends from school and university, a close aide, only one royal and a friend of Diana's. It's a far cry from the usual choice of senior royals and aristocrats. William and Charles' godparents include King Constantine II, Princess Alexandra, King George VI, Queen Mary, Princess Margaret, King Haakon of Norway and Prince George of Greece.

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