Bunny Island, Fox Village, Cat Island: A Look Into Japan's Paradises for Animal Lovers

PHOTO: Two tourists sit and feed hundreds of rabbits at Okunoshima Island, also known as "Rabbit Island," on Feb. 24, 2014, in Takehara, JapanChris McGrath/Getty Images
Two tourists sit and feed hundreds of rabbits at Okunoshima Island, also known as "Rabbit Island," on Feb. 24, 2014, in Takehara, Japan. Okunoshima is a small island located in the Inland Sea of Japan in Hiroshima Prefecture.

For animal lovers, heaven might just be a place in Japan. The country is home to a fox village, bunny island and cat island where you can find yourself delightfully swarmed by hundreds of these free-roaming, furry animals.

Here's a look into the paradises for animal lovers:

Okunoshima: Bunny Island

Hundreds of friendly feral bunnies hop "all over" this small island and approach tourists to their delight," said Elliss Krauss, a professor of Japanese politics and policy-making at University of California San Diego.

"They are very friendly and hope to be fed," Krauss told ABC News today. But he added that despite the bunnies' cuteness, the island has a dark history with them.

This small island was kept secret and off the maps during World War II when Japan produced poison gas on Okunoshima for chemical warfare against China. Where today's bunnies came from remains a mystery. Scientists debate whether they're descendants of test bunnies that were used at the poison gas factories, The Guardian reported.

Miyagi Zao Fox Village

For less than 1000 yen ($9), you can find the answer to the elusive question, "What does the fox say?" at this sanctuary where 100 foxes scamper freely, according to the village's website.

The attraction is in a forest in the scenic Miyagi Zao mountains, which makes you feel like you're in the wilderness, according to Japan Travel The site adds you can get up close with the foxes of various colors and even feed them for less than 100 yen ($1). But it's important to be cautious since they can bite, though most of them are tame, the website notes.

Tashirojima: Cat Island

Cat lovers can rejoice on this quiet fishing island where there are four cats to every person, according to Japan Guide.

PHOTO: Cats wait for food on Tashirojima Island on June 10, 2009, in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan. The island has about 100 cats, but only 70 human residents.Sankei/Getty Images
Cats wait for food on Tashirojima Island on June 10, 2009, in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan. The island has about 100 cats, but only 70 human residents.

The kitties were originally brought to the island to help with pest control on the island's silkworm farms. Many of Tashirojima's locals, most of whom are above 65 years old, believe feeding the hundreds of stray cats bring good luck and fortune.

But for dog lovers, this island may be sad news. No dogs allowed here, according to Atlas Obscura.