Meet Darla, the therapy chicken helping to educate her community

PHOTO: Finn Proctor, 7, adopted Darla, his therapy chicken that is helping to educate his community about humane treatment of animals.PlayErika Proctor
WATCH Meet Darla, the therapy chicken

Meet Darla. She's a therapy chicken, helping to educate people on treating animals more humanely.

Finn Proctor, 7, adopted the silkie chicken when she was just 3 weeks old from a farm. At the time, she looked very ill, Finn's mother Erika Proctor told ABC News.

"My son had found her ... looking very, very sick and he didn't want to leave without taking her home," Proctor explained.

PHOTO: Finn Proctor, 7, adopted Darla, his therapy chicken that is helping to educate his community about humane treatment of animals.Erika Proctor
Finn Proctor, 7, adopted Darla, his therapy chicken that is helping to educate his community about humane treatment of animals.

So the Troy, Virginia, family decided to adopt Darla, who is now 2, along with two other chickens, who didn't survive.

Proctor, who is also the founder of a nonprofit organization that focuses on training therapy animals, Green Dogs Unleashed, said that after seeing how sweet Darla was, they decided to train her to be a therapy chicken.

PHOTO: Finn Proctor, 7, adopted Darla, his therapy chicken that is helping to educate his community about humane treatment of animals.Erika Proctor
Finn Proctor, 7, adopted Darla, his therapy chicken that is helping to educate his community about humane treatment of animals.

"Darla is just so friendly, we started using her to do humane education," she explained. "We’re able to teach others about the care of animals and compassion for animals and how chickens can be pets too."

The mother of two added, "Chickens are more than food."

PHOTO: Finn Proctor, 7, adopted Darla, his therapy chicken that is helping to educate his community about humane treatment of animals.Erika Proctor
Finn Proctor, 7, adopted Darla, his therapy chicken that is helping to educate his community about humane treatment of animals.

Proctor said that she and her son are passionate about teaching with Darla because "humane education is something that's really lacking in our school system."

"We’re able to go into schools, and camps and talk to kids about compassionate care," she added.

Adopting Darla has changed the family completely, even helping them become vegetarians.

"It's brought a whole new level of compassion. There's now 25 chickens and they all have names, they all have personalities. They're our pets," she gushed.