Olivia Wilde Stars in Touching PSA for World Down Syndrome Day

VIDEO: Olivia Wilde is featured in a new public service announcement in honor of World Down Syndrome Day, on March 21. The actress stars alongside 19-year-old AnnaRose from New Jersey.PlayABCNews.com
WATCH Olivia Wilde Stars in Touching PSA for World Down Syndrome Day

A new public service announcement in honor of World Down Syndrome Day stars Olivia Wilde and 19-year-old AnnaRose Rubright, a college student with Down syndrome.

The nearly two-minute PSA titled "How Do You See Me?" is narrated by Rubright, who asks, "I see myself as an ordinary person with an important meaningful beautiful life. This is how I see myself. How do you see me?"

While Rubright speaks, the video shows Wilde, who plays a girl with Down syndrome, living everyday life: enjoying time with family on the beach, working, watching television on the couch with a loved one, doing laundry and even crying.

VIDEO: Olivia Wilde is featured in a new public service announcement in honor of World Down Syndrome Day, on March 21. The actress stars alongside 19-year-old AnnaRose from New Jersey.ABCNews.com
VIDEO: Olivia Wilde is featured in a new public service announcement in honor of World Down Syndrome Day, on March 21. The actress stars alongside 19-year-old AnnaRose from New Jersey.

Rubright, who has been a victim of discrimination for having Down syndrome, said she was excited to be part of the PSA alongside Wilde.

"I want people to try and respect people with Down syndrome and see how smart they are," she told ABC News.

The PSA was created by ad agency Saatchi & Saatchi for CoorDown, Italy's national organization for people with Down syndrome. CoorDown President Sergio Silvestre told ABC News why its latest campaign was so important.

"A real problem for people with Down syndrome is the way people look at them because of their condition," he explained. "The metaphor in the video aims to ... [show] how people with Down syndrome see themselves, whilst revealing the inherent prejudice and discrimination that they face based on society's preconceptions and stereotypical low expectations."

Rubright said the reminder is needed for those in her community.

"I still have friends and love going to school," she told ABC News, adding that she's participated in the Special Olympics and has been able to experience one-of-a-kind opportunities such as meeting the U.S. women's soccer team.