Tarantino and Rodriguez: Who's the Man?

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Part of my joy is working inside of genres -- because I just like genres, and I even like sub-genres, and I think every movie is a genre movie, to one degree or another. But I like working personally in there. All of my movies are about me, and people I know, and things that have happened either under the surface, or right there on the surface. Now, I'm not going to tell you that, or the audience. I'm not going to tell you, "Oh, by the way, this happened to me," or, "This is how I feel about my girlfriend," or anything like that, but it's there. It's me speaking the truth and making it work inside of here.

You're not supposed to say, "Hey, autobiography right here." That's kind of cheap to me, but the people who know me, when they read my scripts, something like "Kill Bill," it's painfully honest to them. "Plant Terror," this Zombie movie, Robert is all over it. Just right there. If you're writing really from the heart, then you should be slightly embarrassed when you hand your written work to somebody who knows you to read it. You should be embarrassed, have to avert your eyes, because you've revealed too much about yourself.

RODRIGUEZ:
We're genre filmmakers. So we end up disguising a lot of that. I wanted to make a movie forever about my family growing up with 10 kids. And I did. I just made them spies. But everything that happens to them is stuff from my childhood. I just disguise it to make it more entertaining for audiences. I don't feel like I'm just telling them my story, telling them things that I want to get across. I put it in there in a different light.

TAPPER:
What's the most autobiographical thing you've ever put in a movie?

TARANTINO:
Oh, gosh. It would be the subtext that actually borders on text in "Kill Bill." I can't -- It's not how it works. You don't go into details. But that is the answer to the question.

TAPPER:
What about you, Robert?

RODRIGUEZ:
Oh, man. I don't want to say. I don't want to say. Even something like "Shark Boy and Lava Girl," the "Spy Kid" movies, one and two in particular. This movie a lot. You disguise it, but you don't want to start telling people or they'll look and they'll see it and go, "Oh, that's him? That's him, too?"

TARANTINO:
It's not about pointing it out and saying, "This is what it is." But it's that reality, that human-heart piece of our blood that gives it depth. So it's not just a dumb deputy and the cool sheriff and all these clich├ęs you've seen before.

'It's Two Movies'

TAPPER:
Has the studio put any pressure on you at all about the length of the movie? Because it's three hours, 15 minutes. It's long. It's a long movie.

TARANTINO:
Yes.

RODRIGUEZ:
Well, it's two movies.

TARANTINO:
It's two movies.

RODRIGUEZ:
Hey, you don't have to stay for both of them? One of them is bonus, you know.

TARANTINO:
Right.

RODRIGUEZ:
Go ahead and see one. Go get your money's worth with one movie and a few trailers, and if you want to walk out after that, that's fine. You can see the other one later, if you want. But I think most people are sitting there. They are going to just not want to leave.

TARANTINO:
Yes, I mean, the thing about it is if you're going to make an omelet, you've got to break a couple of eggs. If you're going to show two movies, you've got to show two movies.

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