Egg Freezing Parties Turn Doctor Visits into Celebrations

Women curious about freezing their eggs can learn more over cocktails, but critics question procedure’s effectiveness.
6:10 | 03/27/15

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Transcript for Egg Freezing Parties Turn Doctor Visits into Celebrations
After Whitney Bischoff said yes during the finale of "The bachelor" she then said it was now time for her and her farmer fiance Chris to "Make some babies." Tonight we're learning more about how serious she was. Years before her reality TV debut she froze her eggs. Egg freezing was become a big business but is it for everyone? Here's Linzie Janis. Reporter: These 30-somethings are posting to the future of their fertility. Tell us about your eggs! Reporter: They're here to learn about freezing their eggs. I am ecstatic to see so many young women here tonight. Reporter: Marketing company egg banks hosts swanky parties like these all over the country. I'm not married now and I'm not really in a steady relationship. So it's another option. Reporter: Teaching women the dream of having it all. Their slogan, lean in but freeze first. The fertility industry is worth $4 billion. Because now more than ever, women are delaying child bibirthchildbirth. Many haven't found the right partner. Others want to focus on careers. Some just aren't ready. Will you marry me? Absolutely. Reporter: 29-year-old Whitney Bischoff recently found the love of her life on ABC's "The bachelor." We're going to make some babies. Oh, yes. Reporter: But two years ago, the fertility nurse decided to freeze her eggs just in case. A huge sense of relief. I just felt it would be silly for me not to take the opportunity when it was handed to me. Reporter: Whitney says seeing patients struggle to conceive on their own made her want to take control. You hear patients say, I just wish I would have known, I wish someone would have told me. I felt like I needed to walk the talk. I felt like I, you know, was taking control of my career and taking control of other aspects of my life. For me it just was giving me options for my future. Reporter: Her doctor says women as young as 20 should consider freezing their eggs too. I think it's applicable to any woman in her 20s or 30s who's thinking forward about her fertility potential and wants to sustain her reproductive age. Because there's such a drop-off in pregnancy rates as women get older. You might get pregnant on your own at 35, but what about your second child? You're 38, 39. Now it drops down significantly. Reporter: But it's an expensive and arduous procedure. $10,000 for medications and initial extraction. $500 per year to freeze and store the eggs. And when you're finally ready to have a baby, it costs about $5,000 to thaw, fertilize, and transfer the egg to your uterus. It usually takes multiple tries. In the end the procedure can cost anywhere between $25,000 and $50,000. And even after putting your body through the drugs and the procedure and spending all that money, there's no guarantee. I think as physicians we've got to be careful that we set expectations. There's disappointments. It might not work. But if you can afford it, it is hard for me to understand why someone would not do it. Reporter: But the technology is relatively new. And there isn't much research on how well it actually works. In the last 30 years, there have been only 5,000 babies born worldwide through egg freezing. Medical researcher Colleen coglin showed my colleague linsey Davis how it works. As soon as the egg is retrieved we bathe the egg in this solution which is very similar to an anti-freeze solution. That is little dot -- That little dot at 9:00, that's the egg. It's put on the cry device. And then immediately plunged into liquid nitrogen. Once they're frozen they're placed in a nitrogen tank. Reporter: At the parties the allure of freezing eggs is obvious for women worried about their biological clock. But bioethicist Josephine Johnson says the marketing hype around the procedure is troubling. I talk to fits about egg freezing cocktail parties. They've been shocked to learn medical interinterventions are being discussed with potential patients while alcohol is being provide sglrd Johnson says she's concerned women aren't hearing enough about the possible medical risks of taking drugs to stimulate their ovaries which is an essential part of the procedure. I would like to see a lot more clarity about what it means to undergo treatment. It's a medical intervention. You are putting chemicals into your body. There are risks associated with it. Reporter: Some big companies have embraced the idea, making Progressive moves to support their female employees' desire to have kids. Apple and Facebook are covering some of the costs of egg freezing. But Johnson is worried about the message this sends. If the only things they do are offer subsidy for it but they don't actually support the other option of people having children while they're still in natural fertility, it sends a strong message about what you're supposed to do. One of the problems with the large uptake of egg freezing technology is I believe it sends a message to women that the problem of trying to reconcile family, relationships, career, is something that women alone need to take responsibility for and it's on their backs, it's their bodies that's the problem. Reporter: For Whitney, making her wedding plans and thinking about her future with Chris, she says having frozen her eggs gives her an added sense of security. I think, you know, we're just taking it step by step. We've had a lot of changes, coming public with our relationship, then "Dancing with the stars." So right now we're just trying to enjoy each other. And we'll get there. Reporter: For "Nightline," I'm Linzie Janis in New York. Our thanks to Linzie. What do you think about the pros and cons of freezing eggs? Go to our "Nightline" Facebook page and let us know in the comment section.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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