George Zimmerman Juror: 'In Our Hearts, We Felt He Was Guilty'

In an ABC News exclusive, "GMA's" Robin Roberts talks with the woman known as Juror B29.
3:00 | 07/25/13

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Transcript for George Zimmerman Juror: 'In Our Hearts, We Felt He Was Guilty'
It was a dramatic moment for America when the jury in the George -- trial finally delivered a verdict not guilty. Adding fuel to a fire of racial tensions flaring across the country. But what wasn't like for the jurors themselves tonight one woman comes forward. To tell us what happened on the other side of those close doors ABC's Robin Roberts. Sat down for an exclusive interview with a woman who felt the weight of the world on her shoulders. We the jury find George -- not guilty. But not guilty verdict that said George -- -- in the shooting death of seventeen year old tree on -- rattled the nation with many Americans questioning the jury's decision and wanting to ask the jurors a very tough. Question some people have said George Zimmerman got away with murder. How do you respond to those people who say that -- Zimmerman got away with that. But you can't get away from that. Juror B 29 Matty came forward today in an ABC news exclusive interview. Us she said it wasn't an easy decision. It's hard for me to sleep it's hard for me the you haven't asked for money you have and -- for book deal you have and ask for anything other than a forum to be people. To tell your story you. I don't need money -- money in this world -- couldn't cut it pains me to forget the pain that I'm going -- Chain on -- will always be in my heart. But she wanted to talk about the verdict the jury reached -- and about what she sees as perhaps a -- justice. At the end of the day. He's gonna have a lot of questions and answers he has to deal with. The law could improve it. We just have -- so that he and Lawler that he's. Of these acts of paid leave people paid -- -- says putting her emotions aside is only considering the law this was not easy. I stand by the decision because -- And I stand by the decision because in my heart. He -- of -- Up 36 year old mother of eight who calls herself a black Hispanic was the only a minority on the jury. Since the verdict and the public backlash she says she has been ridden with guilt I feel that -- was forcibly. Including. -- -- -- -- The shooting death of seventeen year old tree -- Martin brought the issue of race in America back to the forefront. After Zimmerman acquittal. Outrage ignited across the country. So how do you respond when you see people who are for making this about race who -- saying. Had trade -- not been a young black man. That. The conversation would be different is it shouldn't. That's a question it to -- -- Even the president brought it up there are very few African American man in this country who have made the experience. Being followed when they were shopping -- department -- That includes me. Just like Obama I -- a lot of places and if people don't follow me sometimes -- on Martin's parents reaction to the verdict echoes the feelings of many Americans. I really didn't believe dad. He was not guilty. While George Zimmerman has remained silent his parents spoke to ABC news offering an apology to trade bonds family we. -- the starting. What this kind of thing but for -- -- Martin's parents Sabrina Fulton and -- -- up fight for justice continues as they consider a civil suit. It's not just about. The trade -- -- case now it's about your keys it's about other key hits. Two days after the verdict another juror be 37 spoke to Anderson Cooper on CNN I think both were responsible. For the situation they had gotten themselves -- to I think both of them could -- walked away. There -- some things that the other jurors said that makes you -- to respond to. Eight days seven use the word we I guess because wearing a jury together. She put it on -- in the group -- -- -- she made a lot of -- analysts. We what I call. And that's what I -- and that was something that a lot of people from the outside -- must have been a discussion. In the deliberations about about race about color but that wasn't the case it was not the case. In their first vote be 37 told CNN three jurors wanted not guilty one who -- -- murder second degree. And two wanted manslaughter. What was your first my first goal was second -- -- how did you go from in nine Allen's. From feeling he was guilty of second degree murder. To not guilty. In -- nine hours. It was hard a lot of us -- -- -- -- find something bad something that we can connect to the law because. For myself. He's guilty because. The evidence analyses that he's guilty of killing -- Wal-Mart. But as allow us brits and me. If you have no proof that he killed them intentionally. You can. Sign you can things get what was going on in your mind -- part I was -- that was gonna give -- -- -- harmless. I fought to the end do you have regrets that you didn't come. I mean I'm the only minority. And I felt like I -- a lot of people. This polarizing case began in a gated community in Sanford Florida. On February 262012. Martin was walking back to a house where he and his father were -- he caught the attention of the self appointed neighborhood watch captain George Zimmermann who called police. This -- look like he's -- cougar. Is on drugs or home. They suggested he stay in his car. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- What happened next is in dispute but this seems to be no question there was an altercation loud enough so that multiple neighbors called 911. At issue. Who was the attacker. It's a group that it's. Important. Zimmerman fired one gun shot and killed -- -- on -- those 911 calls were believed to be crucial pieces of evidence whose voice that you. Think it was an 11 call I have never. Really really -- mind so was -- 'cause. The evidence shows that people's voices changed when -- in extreme. Most. During the trial the FBI's audio expert did testify that it is impossible to tell who was screaming for help. During their sixteen hours of deliberations the consideration -- a possible manslaughter verdict weighed heavily on Matty. When you -- sent that note. To the judge. Asking for an explanation. On manslaughter. What was that about what we were trying to figure out was. Manslaughter. In order to be charge we had to prove. That when he left home. He said I'm gonna go kill train -- Her own lawyer David Chico says even legal experts. What had been confused. I thought a lot about it and I haven't really been able to come up but I didn't -- really and other charges as -- I mean I think manslaughter. Was a charge that could be put forth. Matty says she had no idea. That the world was watching so closely. After the jury was released she says she crumbled. As a negative news reports about their verdict erupted. I literally follow my niece and I broke down my husband was holding me I was screaming crying and I kept saying to myself. I feel like I kept them. And I feel that if maybe they -- put the law. And and I people who read it would understand. The choice is that they gave us. She says the choices she made she still stands by today we're gonna go from here. My hope is that we stop walking around looking. -- -- That also seemed to hope but the devastated parents a trailer on -- who have been giving a kind of you master class in forgiveness. We continue to pray that. -- -- We have fire and peace of string of -- to be forgiven parents but what you what would you like to say the trip -- parents. -- -- -- -- Apologize. Because. I feel like I. I didn't know how much importance I was -- this case. Because I never looked at Conan. And I still don't -- -- color. For Nightline. Robin Roberts New York.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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