Surviving San Pedro Sula, World's Most Dangerous City

Fusion goes inside the Honduran city plagued by drug trafficking and gang violence, creating scores of migrants fleeing for their lives.
7:22 | 08/29/14

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Transcript for Surviving San Pedro Sula, World's Most Dangerous City
And tonight, we're going to take you straight into the most dangerous and violent city on Earth. The murder capital of the world, in fact. You know all those women and children coming across our southern border right now, you're about to see what they're running from. And it's horrifying. Don Lieberman, from our sister network, fusion, reports, tonight, from Honduras. Reporter: We just got word there is a shooting here in this neighborhood. There's several people who have been shot. There's a huge crowd of people who are looking on at the scene. We've been here just four hours. And already, we've seen six murders. This crime scene is so fresh, authorities are still looking for the killers in the crowd. One police officer has been gunned down. Five gang members are dead. Every hour and 15 minutes, somebody gets killed here. This is not Iraq or Afghanistan. Honduras is a different kind of war. And we're in the most dangerous city in the world. San Pedro sula. There's one kid being questioned by police right now. And sources tell us, he may be a gang member. Reporter: He can't be more than 14 years old. Gangs here can force kids as young as 7 years old, to join the drug trade. His mother knows too well. She lost her 16-year-old son a few months ago. He was shot to death by the gang. We won't show the parents' faces or their names because they're still in danger. The gangs are after their oldest son, too. Reporter: For their son's protection, they send him into hiding, to a safehouse, a few hours away. Tonight, they will take us to see him. Do you feel like you need to get out? Reporter: Gang violence, fueled by drug trafficking, makes here the ground zero for migrants being the danger zone. Forcing some parents to hand off their children to strangers to save them. This exodus is causing the crisis on the U.S. Border. 80% of the cocaine that comes into the United States, passes through Honduras first. Here we are. We're at another crime scene now. We got word that three people were shot. And may have been a drug shoot-out. One guy is playing in the parking lot behind his truck over here. The car just riddled with bullet holes. Gangs and cartels are the usual suspects. During the week we were here, 39 people were murpded in and around San Pedro sula. Many of them under the age of 20. Military patrol is looking for gang members in one of the most violent neighborhoods. Why the dangerous for your team? Translator: They're ready for anything. They come ready to kill. Reporter: But there's only so much they can do. Anyone they talk to would become a target. The families of murder victims rarely see justice. Some 97% of murders here go unsolved. Do you think there's going to be justice for jimmy? Reporter: Morales is an investigator, helping the family track down their son's killer. He says the 16-year-old was shot five times. In this case, he thinks he has a lead. Translator: We don't know his name yet, but his area, his characteristics and where he operates. Reporter: There's one thing the investigator can't tell his parents. Their son might have been in a gong. Translator: As a parent, imagine someone killing your son and telling them he's in a gang. I'm not going to tell them. They're humble people and deserve respect. Reporter: Their 16-year-old son ended up here. It looks like a bus station. But it's the city morgue. And dozens of people are waiting out here for information on their loved ones. There's just bodies piled up in here from all of the violent. This woman has been waiting all night and all day to claim her husband's body. He was shot the night before for his cell phone, killed right in front of her. Reporter: Her father waits nearby. At first, barely able to Sak. I'm afraid. Reporter: You're afraid for your daughter's life? Both of them are so scared. They don't want us to show their faces. You're thinking about leaving. Where would you go? Whatever. It doesn't matter. Any country, any place, where we can find peace own work. Reporter: A few feet away, parents are desperately looking for their missing children. Not sure if they're dead or alive. Later that night, the family who sent their son away for his own protection, took us to see him. We're driving about two hours outside San Pedro sula, with the family who lost their son to the violence here. We're going to meet their 17-year-old son, who is in hiding for his own safety. The 17-year-old has been at this safehouse, hiding from the same gang that murdered his younger brother. Are you scared right now? Translator: I'm scared something will happen to my sister, my mom or my dad. Reporter: Talk to me about the gangs. Do they want you? Translator: They were threatening me. Telling me to join them. If not, they would get rid of me, too. That's why I'm hiding. Reporter: He turns 18 next month and hopes the military has a shot for him. When I'm in the military, I want to fight them better myself. Reporter: But he still won't be able to escape the gangs. For this family of the 17-year-old in hideling, it's time to go. A last hug. A son's promise to try to stay safe. In San Pedro sula, no one knows if they 34may be seeing their loved ones for the next time. For more on Dan's extraordinary reporting on this story, head over to fusion.net.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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