Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at ASU

The Cronkite School is a nationally recognized professional program that prepares students for careers as reporters, editors, producers, correspondents, anchors, media managers and public relations specialists. Our students go on to online media outlets, television stations, newspapers, magazines, radio stations, newsletters, public relations firms and corporate and government public relations departments.

We consistently rank in the top 10 in the annual Hearst intercollegiate journalism competition, often called the Pulitzers of college journalism (in 2007 we were first in the nation following two consecutive years at No. 2). And our students have finished first in the Society of Professional Journalists' Mark of Excellence competition for two straight years. Our faculty consists of award-winning professional journalists and world-class media scholars. We are in the middle of one of the nation's largest media markets. And each year we draw extraordinarily bright, inquisitive, passionate and diverse students from across the country.

In August 2008, the Cronkite School moved to the center of downtown Phoenix. Our students are learning in a new, state-of-the-art journalism building that is unparalled in journalism education, equipped with 14 digital newsrooms and computer labs, two TV studios, 280 digital student work stations, the Cronkite Theater, the First Amendment Forum and the latest and most sophisticated technology found anywhere. Our students are now just a quick walk to The Arizona Republic, three major network-affiliated TV stations, the state's dominant news Web site, radio stations and public relations agencies.

ASU's journalism program exploded onto the national education landscape in 1984 when the school was named in honor of Walter Cronkite, the longtime CBS Evening News anchor. For more than two decades now, the person who is often called "The Most Trusted Man in America" because of his journalistic excellence and integrity has helped shape and grow the program into a national journalism powerhouse.

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