2014 Midterm Elections Results: What We Know About Who Voted

PHOTO: A voter casts her vote in a voting booth, Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014, in Thornton, Colo.PlayJack Dempsey/AP Photo
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Voters who came out to cast their ballots today looked and acted a little bit different than they have in past years.

Here are the major demographic trends of the 2014 midterm elections:

Unmarried women are voting 61-37 percent for the Democrats in the House. These numbers mark a significant shift in the way unmarried women voted this year. This 24-point margin is the slimmest advantage for Democrats in this group in available data back to 1992.

White men are voting Republican 63-35 percent. This marks another significant shift, with a much larger margin of white men voting Republican than in recent elections. This ties with 2010 for the widest Republican advantage in this group in data since 1984.

Voters under age 30 are voting Democratic by a 13-point margin, 55-42 percent. This compares to 60-38 percent in 2012. Young voters’ share of the electorate is down from 19 percent in 2012 to 13 percent now.

Seniors, meanwhile, are voting Republican by 56-43 percent, and there are many more of them than young voters. This group has grown by 7 percent, making it 24 percent of the electorate is seniors, up from 17 percent in 2012.