Lynette 'Squeaky' Fromme, Manson Follower and Would-Be Assassin Out of Prison

Prosecutor Bugliosi Warns There Is Danger in Letting Fromme Out of Prison

During the trial, Fromme was convicted of trying to prevent other "Family" members from testifying and of contempt of court for refusing to testify herself. She was given short jail terms.

The prosecutor who put Charles Manson behind bars 40 years ago said Fromme remained a danger and said she should not be released from prison.

"If you do something like that against the president of the United States, the need for deterrence increases when you're talking about the most important person," said, Vincent Bugliosi, the former Los Angeles County assistant district attorney.

"She was the main gal in the family. Once Manson left the ranch, if he was anywhere else she was in charge," Bugliosi said.

During her own incarceration for the Ford assassination attempt, Fromme attacked another inmate in 1979 with a claw hammer and was transferred out of the women's prison in Dublin, Calif.

In 1987, Fromme became so upset at the news that Manson had testicular cancer that she broke out of the Alderson Federal Prison Camp in West Virginia in an attempt to reach Manson. She was captured two days later.

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 8327414. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 8327414. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 8327414. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 8327414. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 8327414. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 8327414.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: Patrick Crawford is pictured in this photo from his Facebook page.
Meteorologist Patrick Crawford KCEN/Facebook
Kate Middleton Learns Sign Language
Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images
PHOTO: George Stinney Jr., the youngest person ever executed in South Carolina, in 1944, is seen in this undated file photo.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History/AP Photo
PHOTO: Johns Hopkins University sent nearly 300 acceptance emails to students who had actually been denied.
Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun/Getty Images