The Note: Winter's Tale

Sen. Clinton reacted to the State of the Union with a statement saying: "The President finally acknowledged the problem of global warming and the need to develop alternative energy sources, but he did not offer a real plan to deal with climate change or to put us on a path to energy independence. The President finally addressed the need to deal with the health care crisis, but offered a proposal that does nothing make health insurance more affordable or accessible for the millions of uninsured and underinsured Americans. The President called for No Child Left Behind to be reauthorized this year, but has failed to ensure the funding needed to fulfill the promise of this landmark law. And instead of charting a new course in Iraq, including the political solution desperately needed, so that we can begin to bring our troops home, the President continued his defense of failed strategy and his escalation plan in Iraq."

On "Good Morning America," Sen. Obama told ABC News' Robin Roberts that what struck him most was "the lack of enthusiasm on the Republican side, not just the Democratic side, for the President's approach to Iraq."

While appearing on CNN's "American Morning," Sen. Obama said President Bush "talked about health care and energy. It's not how I would approach them but they are serious proposals and the Democrats should take a look at them and consider them."

Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL), talking to Harry Smith, said that President Bush "has not made the case" for his war strategy, but that the president "deserves a lot of credit" for his work fighting AIDS in Africa.

John Edwards reacted to President Bush's health care proposals by saying that the President's proposal "offers much more help to a family making $300,000 than one making $30,000. The time for patching up our health care system has ended. We need universal health care in this country and we need it now." On Iraq, Edwards reiterated his contention that "President Bush's decision to adopt the McCain Doctrine and escalate the war in Iraq is terribly wrong."

Gov. Richardson's office put out a statement saying that the governor "agreed that the nation must dramatically improve vehicle fuel efficiency but" criticized the President's plan by saying that it does not "provide enough specifics. It also leaves too many loopholes to achieve the kind of improvements necessary to wean the country off foreign oil and reduce vehicle emissions." On health care, Gov. Richardson "applauded the President for addressing the healthcare crisis facing the country but" said he believes the proposals "don't go far enough to help the tens of millions of Americans without health insurance." And on Iraq, Gov. Richardson "reiterated his opposition to the President's" strategy and said he "believes the United States can and must get" its "troops out of Iraq by the end of 2007."

Gov. Tom Vilsack (D-IA) reacted to the President's Iraq ideas on Hot Soup by writing: "The brightest minds on Madison Avenue couldn't sell the President's Iraq policy. His own military advisors, the Iraq Study Group, members of Congress from both sides of the aisle -- and most importantly the American people -- aren't buying it. It is up to Congress to fulfill their Constitutional responsibility to send a message that this policy is not good for the nation."

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