Ben Carson Defends Muslim Remarks: 'Our Real Problem Is Our Politically Correct Culture'

PHOTO: Ben Carson holds a press conference, Sept. 22, 2015.PlayPool/ABC News
WATCH Ben Carson Defends Muslim Remarks, Blames 'PC Culture'

In Ben Carson's first news conference since his controversial comments about Muslims, Carson again stood by his remarks saying the real problem is our "politically correct culture."

"Sharia law is completely antithetical to Americanism," Carson told reporters minutes before his upcoming rally. "We need to fix America, and we need to get people to actually start listening and being capable of understanding our Constitution."

Carson said he has heard from a lot of Muslim-Americans, some of whom he claims he has worked with, trained and operated on who agree with his stance.

"They say we know you and what you're saying," Carson said at the presser.

WHAT TO KNOW
  • In Dr. Carson's first news conference before a rally in Sharonville, Ohio since his controversial comments about Muslims being unfit for the presidency, Carson again stood by his remarks saying the real problem is our "politically correct culture."

After coming under fire from the Council on American-Islamic Relations, who has demanded that Carson drop out of the presidential race, Carson said that he is open to a discussion with the group.

"A lot of the problem is that people get in their respective corners. It’s not helpful to have gladiator fights," said Carson.

Carson also took time to address Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker's announcement that he is suspending his presidential campaign.

“For some reason it just was not catching on," Carson said. "And maybe it's just not the right time, but I have nothing but admiration for him."

ABC’s Tom Llamas asked Carson at the presser, “Was Walker trying to send you a message by asking for candidates to drop out?”

Carson responded, "No, he wasn't trying to send me a message to drop out. When he said the current front runner it was clear what he was saying."

Carson concluded his remarks by reiterating his stance on who should be allowed to hold the nation’s highest office.

“Anyone who is running for president should embrace the Constitution and should place it above their personal beliefs," he remarked. "Anyone who can't do that should not be running for the presidency."