Best Lines of the Democratic Debate in Miami

PHOTO: Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt, speaks, as Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton listens, during the Univision, Washington Post Democratic presidential debate at Miami-Dade College, March 9, 2016, in Miami.PlayWilfredo Lee/AP Photo
WATCH Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders Trade Blows at Democratic Debate

Just 24 hours after Bernie Sanders' big win in Michigan, he and Hillary Clinton are battling it out in the Sunshine State.

The two Democratic hopefuls are offering their final pitches to Florida voters before they hit the polls next Tuesday.

Here are the best lines of tonight's debate hosted by Univision and the Washington Post:

ON THE MICHIGAN PRIMARIES

CLINTON: “I was pleased that I got 100,000 more votes last night than my opponent and more delegates. So this is a marathon, and it's a marathon that can only be carried out by the kind of inclusive campaign that I'm running."

“It was a very close race. We've had some of those. I've won some. I've lost some,” she added.

SANDERS: “We have come a long way in 10 months.”

“I believe that our message of the need for people to stand up and tell corporate America and Wall Street that they cannot have it all is resonating across this country.”

ON HILLARY CLINTON’S EMAIL CONTROVERSY

CLINTON: “There's a lot of questions in there. And I'm going to give the same answer I've been giving for many months.”

When asked by Univision’s Jorge Ramos whether she would drop out of the race if she were indicted, Clinton fired back: “Oh, that's not going to happen. I'm not even answering that question.”

ON DONALD TRUMP

CLINTON: “I called him out when he was calling Mexicans rapists, when he was engaging in rhetoric that I found deeply offensive. I said, ‘Basta [enough].”

SANDERS: “I think that the American people are never going to elect a president who insults Mexicans, who insults Muslims, who insults women, who insults African-Americans and let us not forget that several years ago, Trump was in the middle of the so-called birther movement trying to delegitimize the president of the United States of America.

“My dad was born in Poland. I know a little bit about the immigrant experience. Nobody has ever asked me for my birth certificate. Maybe it has something to do with the color of my skin,” the Vermont senator added.

ON BERNIE SANDERS’ FLIP-FLOPPING ON IMMIGRATION

SANDERS: “What I believe right now is not only that we need comprehensive immigration reform. If the Congress does not do its job, as president of the United States I will use the executive powers of that office to do what has to be done to do what President Obama did and expand on that.”

ON DEPORTING UNDOCUMENTED IMMIGRANTS

CLINTON: “I will not deport children. I would not deport children. I do not want to deport family members, either. I want to prioritize who would be deported: violent criminals, people planning terrorist attacks, anybody who threatens us.”

SANDERS: “I will not deport children from the United States of America.”

“I can make that promise,” Sanders repeated.

SANDERS vs. CLINTON’S RECORD

SANDERS: “I will stand -- my career, political career fighting for workers, fighting for the poorest people in this country. Madam Secretary, I will match my record against yours any day of the week.”

ON TRUMP’S WALL PROPOSAL

CLINTON: “He's talking about a very tall wall, a beautiful tall wall, the most beautiful tall wall, better than the Great Wall of China that would run the entire border, that he would somehow magically get the Mexican government to pay for, and, you know, it's just fantasy.”

ON CLINTON’S RELATIONSHIP WITH WALL STREET

SANDERS: “Secretary's words to Wall Street has really intimidated them, and that is why they have given her $15 million in campaign contributions.”

“Wait a minute. I just think it's worth pointing out that the leaders of the fossil fuel industry, the Koch brothers, have just paid to put up an ad praising senator Sanders,” Clinton interjected.

ON BENGHAZI

CLINTON: “This is not the first time we lost Americans in a terrorist attack. We lost 3,000 people on 9/11. We lost Americans serving in embassies in Tanzania and Kenya when my husband was president. We lost 250 Americans when Ronald Reagan was president in Beirut. At no other time were those tragedies politicized. Instead people said let's learn the lesson and save lives.”

ON COLLEGE TUITION

CLINTON: “The government has to quit making money off of lending money to young people to get their education.”

Sanders responded saying: “What secretary Clinton said is absolutely right. I think I said it many months before she said it, but thanks for copying a very good idea.”

Clinton touted back, “Senator Sanders has talked about free college for everybody, he's talked about universal single payer health care for everybody, and yet when you ask questions it's very hard to get answers.”

ON SANDERS

CLINTON: “I wish he would criticize and join me in criticizing George W. Bush, who I think wrecked the economy and created the conditions for the great recession.”

SANDERS: “I gather Secretary Clinton hasn't listened to too many of my speeches or followed my work in the congress because very few people stood up to George W. Bush, whether it was the war in Iraq or any other of his policies.”

ON US INTERVENTIONS IN LATIN AMERICA

SANDERS: “The United States was wrong to try to invade Cuba. The United States was wrong trying to support people to overthrow the Nicaraguan government, the United States was wrong to try to overthrow the democratically elected government of Guatemala. Throughout the history of our relationship with Latin America we've operated under the so-called Monroe doctrine, and that said the United States had the right do anything they wanted do in Latin America.”