Bill Clinton Super-Fans of the 1990s Reuniting for Hillary Clinton

PHOTO: The "Arkansas Travelers for Bill" campaigning for Bill Clinton in 1992. The group is about to hit the road to campaign for Hillary Clinton. Sheila Bronfman
The "Arkansas Travelers for Bill" campaigning for Bill Clinton in 1992. The group is about to hit the road to campaign for Hillary Clinton.

The Bill Clinton super-fans of the 1990's are about to reunite — this time for Hillary Clinton.

They’re called the “Arkansas Travelers.”

While they have no official affiliation with the campaign, many in this group of hundreds, which first formed in 1991 during Bill Clinton’s presidential race, have long-lasting, personal relationships with the Clintons going back for years. Some are even childhood friends.

Now more than 20 years later, the “Travelers” are once again hitting the campaign trail in support of Hillary Clinton.

A group of 18 of them are traveling from Little Rock to New Hampshire today for a 5-day swing where they plan to go door-to-door talking to voters about their old-friend.

On their tightly-packed agenda are visits to Manchester, Keene, Hampton Falls and Portsmouth where they’ll visit house parties, phone banks and community centers.

They will wrap up their itinerary on Monday by making a visit to the State House in Concord where Hillary Clinton herself will be filing to get on the state’s primary ballot.

Included in this group, are five of the original “Travelers" who campaigned for Bill Clinton in 1992 and 1996, and for Hillary Clinton in 2008.

PHOTO: A group of the Arkansas Travelers for Bill during a campaign stop in 1992. Sheila Bronfman
A group of the "Arkansas Travelers for Bill" during a campaign stop in 1992.

One couple is Ann and Morris Henry, who hosted the Clintons’ wedding reception in Fayetteville, Ark. in 1975. The group’s founder and current leader, Sheila Bronfman, who spent this past summer corralling the “Travelers” back together, will also be on the road.

The goal of the trip, she explained, is to introduce voters to the woman that they know — an effort that could prove beneficial to Clinton, who has struggled over the course of her campaign with likability.

“We’re going to talk to voters, talk about our experiences with her, what she did for us in Arkansas, what kind of person she is and what kind of president she’ll be,” Bronfman said. "It’s important for people to get to know her like we know her. People need to see her in a different light than how she is portrayed.”