Congress Set to Grill Big Oil Bosses on Tax Subsidies, Gas Prices

Share
Copy

Congress Scheduled to Grill Big Oil on Subsidies

Across Capitol Hill, House Republicans have shown little appetite to back what could be seen as a vote to raise taxes. House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio told ABC News in an exclusive interview last month that oil companies deserve a share of the blame for rising gasoline prices and that he believes reviewing oil subsidies is "certainly something we should be looking at."

But Boehner later backed off the comments and indicated that he does not want to consider the Democrats' bill.

The bill, known as the "Close Big Oil Tax Loopholes Act," would cut about $2 billion per year in tax subsidies for the five major oil companies by eliminating the domestic manufacturing tax deduction and closing a loophole Democrats say "amounts to the U.S. government subsidizing foreign oil production."

The bill's sponsors -- Democrats Bob Menendez of New Jersey, Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Claire McCaskill of Missouri -- are all up for reelection next year.

"There is more hot air around this building about deficit reduction than any other topic right now, and if we cannot end subsidies to the five biggest most profitable corporations in the history of the planet that come from the federal taxpayer, then I don't think anyone should take us seriously about deficit reduction," McCaskill said at a news conference Tuesday. "The bottom line is this: If we can't do this, if we can't remove subsides from these profitable big oil companies, then I don't know if we can ever get to the really difficult work that lies ahead."

Menendez said, "If the big five oil companies could just live with $123 billion in profits in 2011, they could pay their fair share in taxes, help lower the deficit and not raise the price of gasoline, and all of the savings here go directly to deficit reduction. This is not an argument about there's other spending we'd like to do; this is about going directly to deficit reduction.

"I don't think that the average American paying nearly $4 a gallon at the pump is going to believe that Big Oil needs another penny and a half out of them in order to earn another $2 billion. I don't think anybody believes that."

Democrats, led by Menendez, even gathered Wednesday at an Exxon station on Capitol Hill where regular gas was $4.29 a gallon to urge the Big Five oil companies to give up taxpayer-funded subsidies in an effort to bring down the deficit.

"Tell the truth," Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said. "You don't need this subsidy, and it ought to go to reducing the deficit."

Thursday's hearing is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. ABC News' John R. Parkinson and Arlette Saenz contributed to this report.

Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...