Hillary Clinton Received Speeding-Ticket Scam Email on Private Account

PHOTO: Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at a Women for Hillary grassroots organizing meeting, Sept. 10, 2015, in Columbus, Ohio.PlayJay LaPrete/AP Photo
WATCH More of Hillary Clinton's Email Released Today

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton received email on her private account that appeared to be part of a phishing scam, newly released documents show.

On the morning of Aug. 3, 2011, Clinton received five pieces of email with the subject line “Uniform traffic ticket,” with two attachments included. The email came from an address that resembled a New York City government account and contained a heading from the “New York State – Department of Motor Vehicles.”

It listed details of an alleged speeding violation and urged the recipient to print out the ticket and send it to a mailing address.

The messages, which were part of a State Department release of about 6,300 pages of email from Clinton’s personal account, bear resemblance to messages sent during a 2011 speeding-ticket phishing scam.

The Clinton campaign contends the former secretary of state did not open the email nor was her private server breached.

"We have no evidence to suggest she replied to this email nor that she opened the attachment. As we have said before, there is no evidence that the system was ever breached,” Nick Merrill, a spokesman for Clinton, told ABC News. “All these emails show is that, like millions of other Americans, she received spam.”

But the new email may raise further questions about the security of her private server.

In an editorial board meeting with the Des Moines Register last week, Clinton suggested her server had a better security track record than the State Department’s.

“There is no evidence at all that my server was breached and in the State Department we had constant barrages, attacks,” Clinton said.

National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers, the nation’s cyberwarfare chief, said last week he would consider it an opportunity if he knew a foreign leader used a private email account to conduct government business.

ABC News' Justin Fishel and Liz Kreutz contributed to this report.