What's inside Congress' $1 trillion spending bill

PHOTO: The Capitol is seen at dawn in Washington, April 4, 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo
The Capitol is seen at dawn in Washington, April 4, 2017.

Late last night, Congress reached a bipartisan agreement on a massive $1 trillion spending bill that will fund the government through September.

The bill that’s expected to pass later this week puts off a government shutdown and delivers victories for both parties.

Here's what is included in the new spending bill, and what’s been left out:

What's in the funding bill

What Republicans and President Donald Trump can celebrate is that fiscal year 2017 will see a big boost in military spending and border security.

$15 billion will be added to funding for the military. The bill puts the total funding for the Department of Defense around $598.5 billion, which isn’t as much as Trump had proposed. In their budget blueprint released in March, the White House proposed that the base budget for the defense department sit at $639 billion.

$1.5 billion more will be dedicated to border security. Two of the DHS programs that deal with immigration enforcement, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and Customs and Border Protection (CBP), will see increases in their funding.

According to the Appropriations Committee, the bill commits $93.5 billion in total Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terror funding to provide needed resources and training for U.S. troops, to support the efforts against ISIS and other enemies, to support U.S. allies, and to fund diplomatic and humanitarian trips.

In a win for Democrats, the new deal also doesn't block funding for Planned Parenthood or sanctuary cities, both of which Trump threatened to defund.

The deal also includes an increase of $2 billion for National Institutes of Health funding and year-round Pell grants, as opposed to grants only awarded twice per year, also a victory for Democrats.

The bill includes millions in reimbursement for local law enforcement for the protection of the president while he’s in New York City and Florida, fulfilling the requests made by New York and Florida congressional members.

The legislation proposes $150 million more in funding for programs that address the prevention and treatment of opioid addiction.

The bill also requires that the Office of Management and Budget release estimated costs of Trump’s executive orders and presidential memorandums.

What’s left out of the funding bill

The bill deals a blow to a big item on Trump’s agenda -- the “big, beautiful” wall he’s hoping to build on the U.S.-Mexico border.

None of the $1.5 billion in increased funding devoted to border security goes to funding the construction of a physical border wall or hiring of ICE agents.

Also, in a loss for Democrats, this fiscal year’s bill stops funding for the Green Climate Fund, a fund that helps developing nations handle climate change and plays a key role in the 2015 Paris climate agreement.

The bill also doesn't include anything to change the previous administration's policy on Cuba.

The Department of Education and the Environmental Protection Agency will be dealt cuts to their funding. The bill will fund the education department at $68 billion, a $1.2 billion decrease from 2016. The EPA will see a slash of $81.4 million this fiscal year.

This aligns with what Trump wanted but again the cuts aren’t as significant as what the White House proposed back in March. Trump’s budget blueprint hoped for a $9 billion cut in the education department’s budget and a $2.6 billion cut to the EPA.