Obama to 5-Year-Old Gay Marriage Advocate: 'Couldn't Agree More!'

PHOTO: President Barack Obama pauses while speaking at the dedication of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, March 30, 2015, in Boston.Susan Walsh/AP Photo
President Barack Obama pauses while speaking at the dedication of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate, March 30, 2015, in Boston.

Five-year-old Yasmeen Faruqui didn't feel like doing her homework. She insisted she wanted to write to President Obama instead. And he wrote back.

"Please stop war for our world, instead have a meeting," reads Yasmeen's handwritten note, posted to Twitter by her aunt. "Please give a speech to tell everyone they can marry who they want."

"Tell your niece I really like her letter. Couldn't agree more!" the commander-in-chief replied Friday on Twitter. It's just the sixth tweet on his new account.

Yasmeen's words were all her own, her mother told ABC News. (After all, only a 5-year-old would note she's "almost six" in a letter to the leader of the free world.)

"I just let her do her thing," Tasha Faruqui said. "Those are absolutely her spontaneous ideas. ... She has a mind of her own!"

Yasmeen, who's set to participate in a family member's same-sex wedding ceremony this fall, was bothered when her playmates insisted "boys can't marry boys."

"I don't think that's wrong," she told her mom.

"She's very much an independent thinker," Yasmeen's aunt, Fahmida Zaman, told ABC. "She attempts to respectfully color outside the lines."

Because her father serves in the Navy, war has always scared Yasmeen. When she heard the president had read her letter, she went through the roof.

"This means the war's going to end! He got the letter," Yasmeen yelled.

When her mother explained that isn't quite how diplomacy works, Yasmeen was still ecstatic: "Now he got my message and he can share my message," she told her mom.

"I think it says a lot about our president, responding to a letter of a 5-year-old. That's pretty remarkable," Zaman said. "It lets her feel like her voice is heard."