The Rookies: Paul Gosar On the Rise in Arizona

Share
Copy

For his part, Gosar says he's "never been chased down" for taxes, explaining that his delinquent payments were the result of "paying forward" health care benefits to his employees during the holiday season rather than making the first tier of Arizona tax payments in November.

On not debating Kirkpatrick, he jokes that he's "known as one of the fighting Gosars," the first of ten kids.

"I'd love to debate, but here's the scenario: Our district was made intentionally to be a rural district. We don't need to debate somewhere in an isolated area where Ms. Kirkpatrick can define the questions, isolate herself, and not have to be accountable to her constituents. If we're in a debate, bring it on."

But his answers on a series of issues are comparatively short on specifics for your typical Washington politician.

Gosar on the Issues

On how to balance the budget, Gosar says, "The government needs to start looking at its duplicity. You know, wasteful spending."

On whether gays should be able to serve openly in the military: "I've never served in the military. I have to rely on the military for how it works."

On what to do in Afghanistan: "We've got to keep a presence there because this area is so unstable and I'd rather be sitting around a table trying to make peace there than being served for dinner."

On how he feels about unemployment benefits: "We've got to get people back to work. It's called J-O-B."

On whether there should be a minimum wage: "I'm not a real big fan. I see its purpose, but I think in some aspects it actually hurts the competitive marketplace. I think there's a push and shove. I could argue both ways -- for it or against it. But I think right now what we have to do is get people back to work."

Will his political inexperience derail his campaign? Or will it prove to be a selling point as he seeks to ride his momentum as a Beltway outsider?

Stuart Rothenberg, editor of the "Rothenberg Political Report" newsletter, takes the latter point of view, noting that Gosar is "not the most polished" candidate, but he's running at the "perfect" time.

"Does he have the polish of a guy who's been in the state legislature for 10 years and who knows how to be an insider?" Rothenberg asks aloud. "No, but this cycle that's not the requirement that it's been in the past. I like his chances a lot. I'd be surprised if he doesn't win."

Maybe that explains why Gosar is saying, "Danger, Will Robinson, danger!"

-- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026. -- This embed didnt make it to copy for story id = 11870026.
Page
  • 1
  • |
  • 2
Join the Discussion
You are using an outdated version of Internet Explorer. Please click here to upgrade your browser in order to comment.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
You Might Also Like...
See It, Share It
PHOTO: In this stock image, a lumberjack is pictured.
Joze Pojbic/Getty Images
PHOTO: Left, an undated file photo provided by the Spokane County Sheriff shows Bombing Kevin William Harpham; right, in this undated photo provided by the Johnson County Sheriff, Frazier Glenn Cross, Jr., appears in a booking photo.
Spokane County Sheriff/AP Photo| Johnson County Sheriff via Getty Images
PHOTO: The tires of a Studebaker, missing since 1971, are visible in Brule Creek near Elk Point, S.D. in this undated file photo.
South Dakota Attorney General?s Office/AP Photo