President Trump tells ABC News' David Muir alleged voter fraud probe has 'a lot to look into'

PHOTO: President Donald Trump shows ABCs David Muir around the White House following his first interview as president, Jan. 25, 2017. PlayABC News
WATCH President Trump to Launch Probe Into Alleged Voter Fraud

In an exclusive interview with ABC News, President Trump insisted there is “a lot to look into” as he said he will call for an investigation into alleged voter fraud following his unsubstantiated claim that millions of people illegally cast ballots during the 2016 election.

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“You have people that are registered who are dead, who are illegals, who are in two states. You have people registered in two states. They're registered in a New York and a New Jersey. They vote twice. There are millions of votes, in my opinion,” Trump told "World News Tonight" Anchor David Muir during an interview today at the White House.

The president later added, “When you look at the people that are registered: dead, illegal and two states, and some cases maybe three states -- we have a lot to look into.”

Trump said he’s calling for the investigation because “I want the voting process to be legitimate.”

Throughout the week, the president and members of his administration have repeated unsubstantiated claims that millions of people illegally voted during the 2016 presidential election.

Just weeks after the election, Trump claimed “serious” voter fraud occurred in three states and maintained he would have “won the popular vote if you deduct the millions of people who voted illegally.”

On Tuesday, the National Association of Secretaries of State released a new statement disputing Trump’s claims that millions illegally cast votes during last year’s election.

"We are not aware of any evidence that supports the voter fraud claims made by President Trump, but we are open to learning more about the Administration’s concerns,” the National Association of Secretaries of State said in a statement. “In the lead up to the November 2016 election, secretaries of state expressed their confidence in the systemic integrity of our election process as a bipartisan group, and they stand behind that statement today.”

During an attempt to stop a recount in Michigan last year, Trump’s own legal team wrote, “All available evidence suggests that the 2016 general election was not tainted by fraud or mistake.”

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