First Reports From GOP Nevada Caucuses Indicate Chaos, Confusion

PHOTO: Voters line up outside a Republican caucus site, Feb. 23, 2016, in Las Vegas. PlayJohn Locher/AP Photo
WATCH Inside a Nevada GOP Caucus Ahead

The Nevada GOP caucuses were off to an apparent rocky start, with social media full of reports of ballot shortages, long waits and chaos at precinct sites.

At Spring Valley High School in Las Vegas, where more than 50 precincts are voting, caucus-goers were unsure what line to get in because the precinct lines were not visibly numbered. The numbers were on the tables, so voters could only see if they were in the right line when they were within visible distance of the tables. To help stem the chaos, people started voluntarily holding numbers in the air. Some just voted and left, which is also acceptable.

The Republican National Committee referred ABC News to a tweet from the Nevada GOP Party denying reports that any voting irregularities or violations had occurred.

Emily Cahn, a reporter at Mashable who was on site at Palo Verde High School in Las Vegas, was tweeting that no one was checking IDs, the site had run out of ballots and someone voted for Donald Trump twice:

Cahn subsequently tweeted that “things got smoother” after an RNC official showed up.

This was also the caucus site where Trump made an appearance.

A Nevada GOP official told ABC News that pre-registration had already reached 41,000 before the caucuses began, surpassing the 2012 turnout of 32,000.

In 2012, it took three days to count the votes and declare a winner.