Battle for Two Girls' Hearts

Fourteen-year-old twins Lamb and Lynx Gaede have two albums, music videos, a DVD and devoted fans.

But unlike most other pop sensations, their fans are not your typical teeny boppers -- they're white nationalists.

After ABC first aired a story on Lynx and Lamb in October 2005, the music duo got worldwide attention, becoming fodder for television talk show hosts like Bill Maher and Joe Scarborough. The publicity evoked a lot of outrage and chatter on Internet message boards.

But no one claims to be more outraged than the girls' estranged father, Kris Lingelser.

"Do they know how many people out there will look at [them] and just go -- I mean I get angry, just angry," Lingelser says. "And they don't deserve that anger. They don't deserve that hate. That's not them."

Blond Hair, Blue Eyes

Lamb and Lynx may remind you of another famous pair of teen stars, the Olsen Twins, and the girls say they like that. But unlike the Olsens, who built a media empire on their fun-loving, squeaky-clean image, Lamb and Lynx have cultivated a much darker persona. They are white nationalists and use their talents to preach a message of hate.

Known as Prussian Blue -- a nod to their German heritage and bright blue eyes -- the girls from Bakersfield, Calif., have been performing songs about white nationalism before all-white crowds since they were 9.

"We're proud of being white, we want to keep being white," said Lynx. "We want our people to stay white. ... We don't want to just be, you know, a big muddle. We just want to preserve our race."

Lamb and Lynx have been nurtured on racist beliefs by their mother, April, since the day they were born.

"They need to have the background to understand why certain things are happening," said April, a stay-at-home mom who no longer lives with the twins' father. "I'm going to give them, give them my opinion just like any, any parent would."

A Hue and Cry, and a Fight for Custody

Ted Shaw, a civil rights advocate and president of the NAACP's legal defense fund, says he believes the girls did not come up with their ideas on their own.

"It really breaks my heart to see those two young girls spewing out that kind of garbage," Shaw says. "Obviously, they're being taught. Their minds are being poisoned by somebody. I know nothing about their parents, but I'd start looking there."

Lingelser, who says he is not a racist, also points the finger at the girls' mother. ABC News played him the girls' responses to interview questions, including the girls' statement that Adolf Hitler was "a great man" who "had a lot of good ideas."

"It's just horrible," Lingelser says. "How do I feel? I want it to stop. I want them to not say 'Heil Hitler.'"

Lingelser says he never taught his daughters these ideas and claims he didn't even know how radical their beliefs were until he turned on ABC News' "Primetime" and saw former Ku Klux Klan wizard David Duke with his daughters.

And that's why Lingelser went back to court to try to regain custody, which he lost when he and April first divorced because, he admits, he had a problem with drugs.

"I had a drug issue, and you know, I was not always the most responsible parent," Lingelser says.

ABC News uncovered a troubling letter in which Lingelser threatened to kill April and the twins if she told police of his drug abuse.

Lingelser says he's no longer a threat to his girls. He lives and works in San Diego, and says he's now clean and sober and believes he would be a better parent.

But a judge in California ruled in April's favor. She retains sole custody of Lynx and Lamb.

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