Tom Brady says he doesn't worry about concussions

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. --  New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, whose history with concussions was a hot-button topic this offseason, acknowledged the risk he takes by playing football.

In an interview that will air on "CBS Sunday Morning" on Sunday (9 a.m. ET), Brady said of concussions, "I don't worry about them, no. I mean, I'm not oblivious to them. I understand the risks that come with the physical nature of our game."

When asked by co-host Norah O'Donnell about the impact that studies on concussions might have on the NFL, Brady said, "I don't know what the future is going to look like, and I'm not going to pretend to predict it. I'm going to do everything I can to take care of my body in advance of the hits that I'm going to take on Sunday."

The interview -- which was conducted in the offseason as part of the promotion for his new book, "The TB12 Method: How to Achieve a Lifetime of Sustained Peak Performance" -- took place at Brady's home and also at the TB12 Sports Therapy Center in Foxborough, Massachusetts.

Asked by O'Donnell if there was any chance 2017 could be his final NFL season, Brady said, "No. No."

He later added, "I do want to go out on my terms. I do want to go out playing my best."

Brady's wife, Gisele Bundchen, made headlines in May when she spoke about Brady's health on "CBS This Morning."

"He had a concussion last year," Bundchen said on the program. "He has concussions pretty much every ... I mean, we don't talk about it. He does have concussions. I don't really think it's a healthy thing for a body to go through that kind of aggression all the time. That could not be healthy for you."

Brady was never officially documented with a concussion in 2016.

The NFL and NFL Players Association said earlier this month that they found no evidence of deviation by New England's medical staff from the league's concussion protocol regarding Brady in 2016. League spokesperson Brian McCarthy said Brady had released his records for review as part of the process.

As part of the NFL's statement, the league also reminded players of the importance of self-reporting any concussion-like symptoms.

In early August, when Brady was asked if Bundchen's remarks were accurate, he said: "I don't want to get into things that happened in my past, certainly my medical history and so forth. I really don't think that's anybody's business, what happened last year. I'm focused on this year and improvement and working on things I need to get better at."

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