What It's Like to Use the Oculus Rift Gaming Headset Facebook Just Bought

PHOTO: An attendee wears an Oculus Rift HD virtual reality head-mounted display as he plays EVE: Valkyrie, a multiplayer virtual reality game, at the Intel booth at the 2014 International CES, Jan. 9, 2014 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
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Technology insiders who have had the chance to try Oculus Rift's virtual reality gaming headset raved about its "incredible" ability to transport users to "another world."

Mark Zuckerberg announced Facebook's $2 billion acquisition of the company on Tuesday, saying he believes the virtual reality technology, which is not yet available to consumers, could help people better learn, communicate and experience entertainment in the future.

Josh Luddeni, a New York City-based television finishing editor who has used Oculus Rift, told ABCNews.com it's worth the $2 billion price tag that Facebook paid.

"Within moments of putting on the light headset, you knew that this was the next big thing," he said.

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Luddeni said he used Oculus Rift to play a game of Paper Boy at the Engadget Expand consumer technology event held in New York City last November.

He said he was thrilled to put on the headset again in December at Wired's PopUp Experience in New York City's Meatpacking District, where he was able to tour a virtual model penthouse located steps from the famed Chrysler Building.

"No longer is your New York City apartment small and cozy. You could sit on your couch and be in a whole other location, on a private island on your beach, or in that perfect penthouse you've always wanted," he said.

Chris Cameron, who works at a technology start-up based in Amsterdam, Netherlands, told ABCNews.com he got the chance to interact with an Oculus Rift headset in the office for a few minutes and that it lived up to the hype.

"The way the display reacts to your motion really makes you feel like you're inside the virtual world, much more than just looking at a screen can," he said.

Cameron's only complaint was that the "device itself is a bit heavy and uncomfortable to wear."

"I can see that improving easily," he said. "I'm excited to see what kinds of experiences are developed for Oculus or any of the other similar devices coming to market."

Oculus has come a long way from its humble beginnings on Kickstarter, where its founders raised $2.4 million from early backers in 2012. In exchange for their donations, supporters were given swag that included t-shirts, posters and early developer kits.

The company's old Kickstarter campaign was flooded with some critical comments by people who claimed to be early backers and are now missing out on having equity in the company.

"I'm glad i backed this so you could sellout to facebook. Nicely done!" a user named ingognito wrote.

"I backed this concept in the hopes they'd make something wonderful," a commenter Drew Madsen wrote. "Sadly all they did was make them selves wonderfully rich."

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