© 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Modeling by Stefan Fichtel
  • Unseen Titanic

    At 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912, the "unsinkable" R.M.S. Titanic disappeared beneath the waves, taking with her 1,500 souls. New technologies now reveal the most complete -- and most intimate -- images of the famous wreck. More photos and the complete story are in the <html> <body> <a href=" http://bit.ly/GBBVlD " target="_blank"> April 2012 issue of National Geographic</a> </body> </html>.
    © 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Modeling by Stefan Fichtel
  • Unseen Titanic

    With her rudder cleaving the sand and two propeller blades peeking from the murk, Titanic's mangled stern rests on the abyssal plain, 1,970 feet south of the more photographed bow. This optical mosaic combines 300 high-resolution images taken on a 2010 expedition.
    © 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
  • Unseen Titanic

    Titanic's battered stern, captured here in profile, bears witness to the extreme trauma inflicted upon it as it corkscrewed to the bottom.
    © 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
  • Unseen Titanic

    As the starboard profile shows, the Titanic buckled as it plowed nose-first into the seabed, leaving the forward hull buried deep in mud, obscuring, possibly forever, the mortal wounds inflicted by the iceberg.
    © 2012 RMS TITANIC, INC; Produced by AIVL, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute
  • First-Ever Complete Views of Titanic

    More photos and the complete story are in the April 2012 issue of National Geographic.
    National Geographic
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