Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Shark Men: Tracking the Great White Shark

    The crew from National Geographic's "Shark Men" (formerly called "Expedition Great White") are back for another season that will premiere on April 10 at 9 p.m. ET on the National Geographic Channel. A team of scientists troll the seas in search of great white sharks to capture, tag and release in hopes of learning more about their living and breeding habits.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Shark Men: Tracking the Great White Shark

    Expedition leader Chris Fischer, marine biologist Dr. Michael Domeier and the rest of the "Shark Men" crew risk their lives to study these fierce and mysterious creatures. This season they hope to snag a juvenile great white shark find out more about their early development.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Shark Men: Tracking the Great White Shark

    The "Shark Men" mother ship "Ocean" is a floating, functioning laboratory. It enables the scientists to collect and study blood samples and other data taken from sharks while being out on the water.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Shark Men: Tracking the Great White Shark

    Sailing near Mexico's Guadalupe Island, 160 miles west of Baja, Calif., the "Shark Men" team uses seals as bait to attract the sharks. In this photo, a great white shark was hoisted onto a floating platform called a "shark cradle" after it took the bait attached to a buoy.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    Another shot of the shark on the cradle. Adult great white sharks are 15- to 20 -feet long and can weigh 5,000 pounds or more.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/ Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    Once the shark is out of the water, the "Shark Men" crew has minutes to take measurements and attach a tracking antenna to the dorsal fin before returning it to the water unharmed.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/ Chris Ross
  • Shark Men: Tracking the Great White Shark

    A "Shark Men" cameraman in a wet suit crouches on the shark cradle to film as a great white shark is being lifted out of the water.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    The first season, "Expedition Great White," introduced scientists and sports fishermen coming together off the coast of Baja, Calif. to land the largest predatory fish on earth. Hoping to protect the endangered great white shark, they'll lift the SUV-size creature out of the water and onto a platform to attach a tracking tag and take measurements and DNA samples. In this photo near Guadalupe Island, Mexico, a great white shark approaches a baited buoy.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/ Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    Marine biologist Michael Domeier and his team will use advanced tracking devices to learn more about how the great whites live. But first, they must rely on expedition leader Chris Fischer and his crew to get the creature onto the boat unharmed. In this image, a great white shark takes the bait. The hooks get caught in the corner of the shark's mouth, causing no damage.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    In this photo, the crew of the ship "Ocean" makes changes to the shark cradle on the deck of the ship to lift larger sharks out of the water.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/ Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    In this photo, left to right, Capt. Brett McBride, Michael Domeier and crew members David Olson and John Reed attach a tracking antenna to the dorsal fin of a great white shark. The tracking device will provide information on how the sharks live, how they mate, where they migrate and more.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/ Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    Capt. Brett McBride, Michael Domeier, Chris Fischer and Whitey Evans mount an antenna to the dorsal fin of a great white shark.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/ Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    The crew members, shown here, attach the tracking tag to the great white's dorsal fin because it's the least sensitive part of the shark's body.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/ Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    Marine biologist Michael Domeier draws blood from a great white shark to test its hormone levels and study its breeding patterns. A hydration hose keeps water going through the gills to keep the shark alive.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Great White Shark

    Crew member Chad Kiesel and expert angler Chris Fischer tag a 14-foot female great white shark to track it to its breeding grounds. National Geographic Channel's "Expedition Great White" premieres Monday, Nov. 16, 2009, at 9 p.m. ET/PT. For more information, <a href="http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/expedition-week/4906/Overview" target="external">click here</a>.
    Courtesy © National Geographic Channel/Chris Ross
  • Expedition Great White: Tracking the World's Largest Predatory Fish

    In National Geographic's "Journey to Shark Eden" a team of scientists travel to five remote islands in the Pacific to explore and analyze beautiful coral reefs, teeming with sharks and other exotic sea life. Marine ecologist and National Geographic Fellow Eric Sala headed the team and dubbed the reefs, "Shark Eden." This photo shows a grouper swimming among the pristine corals found around one of the islands.
    National Geographic, tune in to "Journey to Shark Eden" on the National Geographic Channel
  • Expedition Great White: Tracking the World's Largest Predatory Fish

    A blacktip shark patrols a coral reef in "Shark Eden," located among the Southern Line islands. The prominent black tips on these sharks' fins make them easily identifiable.
    National Geographic, tune in to "Journey to Shark Eden" on the National Geographic Channel
  • Expedition Great White: Tracking the World's Largest Predatory Fish

    Grey reef sharks glide through the waters around the northwest tip of Millennium, a reef that is covered in cathedral-like caves and crevices. The lagoon at Millennium Atoll remains untouched by humans and serves as a breeding ground for sharks and other sea creatures.
    National Geographic, tune in to "Journey to Shark Eden" on the National Geographic Channel
  • Expedition Great White: Tracking the World's Largest Predatory Fish

    Marine researcher Katie Barott, left, and coral reef ecologist Forest Rohwer, right, are part of the team of scientists studying "Shark Eden." The duo moved very carefully along the delicate reef, collecting samples.
    National Geographic, tune in to "Journey to Shark Eden" on the National Geographic Channel
  • Expedition Great White: Tracking the World's Largest Predatory Fish

    The team operated from a group of small boats. Dr. Liz Dinsdale and Barott process samples taken from the reefs aboard one of the team's floating labs.
    National Geographic, tune in to "Journey to Shark Eden" on the National Geographic Channel
  • Expedition Great White: Tracking the World's Largest Predatory Fish

    Videographer Manu San Felix films the reef around Vostok Island. The island is one of four wildlife sanctuaries in the Line Islands and the least disturbed island in the group.
    National Geographic, tune in to "Journey to Shark Eden" on the National Geographic Channel
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