Understanding Antarctica's Extremely Low Temperatures

Ted Scambos, the lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo., explains the science behind the world's coldest temperatures.
3:00 | 12/10/13

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

More information on this video
Enhanced full screen
Explore related content
Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Understanding Antarctica's Extremely Low Temperatures
What we're seeing their temperatures. That start off. Quite cold. And then when the sky clears they dropped fairly rapidly it. If that condition can persist for a few days. The ground chills gets quite cold. The ground itself is radiating away heat into space in to clear space. And by getting very cold on the surface you chill the atmosphere that's next to this very -- This -- -- it's getting very cold into the clear sky conditions. Is denser and starts to slide down this huge dome of Antarctic. What you need is a place where -- -- here is actually caught and held for -- So by causing me -- floated the stationary for an extended period to -- the absolute. Lowest temperatures that were able to --

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"id":21163896,"title":"Understanding Antarctica's Extremely Low Temperatures","duration":"3:00","description":"Ted Scambos, the lead scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colo., explains the science behind the world's coldest temperatures.","section":"Technology","mediaType":"Default"}