Iranian Widow Faces Terror Charges

In court papers, the government alleges that the MEK has raised millions of dollars in the United States and throughout the world, much of it through English-language fundraising. It also claims that witnesses have identified Taleb-Jedi as a member of the MEK's military leadership counsel.

"A federal grand jury returned an indictment against a United States citizen who liquefied her personal assets, abandoned her only child, left the United States -- the country to which she had only recently pledged an oath of allegiance -- and traveled to the other side of the globe to support a designated terrorist organization," government attorneys wrote.

During the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, coalition forces attacked and then took over Camp Ashraf. Taleb-Jedi says in court papers that she was forced to hide in a bunker as bombs fell overhead.

"The noise was overwhelming and frightening," she wrote. "The attacks terrified me."

Dead Husband a MEK Member

In interviews with the FBI after a negotiated cease fire, Taleb-Jedi, who came to the U.S. in 1978 and became a citizen in 1996, said she came to the camp in 1999 to be close to her husband's grave, according to an FBI summary of the interviews. Her husband, also a member of the group, was killed during a roadside attack in Iraq in 1999.

She said she knew that the MEK was a designated terrorist organization but believed the label was unfair. Taleb-Jedi says the FBI interviews were coerced.

The group was founded in the 1960s to oppose the late Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. According to the State Department, it was connected to the deaths of U.S. military contractors in the 1970s and supported the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Iran.

The MEK fled to Iraq in the 1980s and has said it has renounced violence. When it was designated as a terrorist organization in 1997, more than 200 members of the U.S. House of Representatives wrote a letter opposing the decision.

When the U.S. raided Camp Ashraf, the FBI says it found mortars, missile launchers, tanks and more than 420,000 pounds of plastic explosives.

Taleb-Jedi returned to the U.S. in 2006. She was arrested at John F. Kennedy airport.

When she was released on $500,000 bail later that year, she weighed 95 pounds and suffered from what her lawyer described as malnutrition and severe digestive problems. She has spent most of the time since then living at a women's shelter in Manhattan.

"She doesn't have any money. She has no income," Miedel said in an earlier interview. "She doesn't have any kind of support."

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